Sri Lanka

Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

Seventy five medicinal plants of the traditional Ayurvedic pharmacopoeia of Sri Lanka have been screened chemically for alkaloids and pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Of these, Crotolaria juncea L. was found to contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids with biological effects consistent with pyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity. Feeding trials in rats with three plants lacking pyrrolizidine alkaloids, namely Aegle marmelos (L.) Corr., Hemidesmus indicus (L.) Ait. F. and Terminalia chebula Retz.

Author(s): 
Arseculeratne, S. N.
Gunatilaka, A. A.
Panabokke, R. G.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Genetic Psychology

Adolescent girls (N = 118) from diverse social backgrounds in Sri Lanka described their views of womanhood. Qualities of the ideal woman considered most important were kindness and honesty, liking children, intelligence, and having a good job. Although the traditional role of the Sri Lankan woman is that of homemaker, most girls in the study (55%) drew the ideal woman working outside the home, often as a teacher or a doctor. Nevertheless, adolescent girls emphasized traditional qualities of the woman at both work and home as self-sacrificing and serving others.

Author(s): 
de Silva, S.
Stiles, D. A.
Gibbons, J. L.
Gibbon, J. L.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Genetic Psychology

Adolescent girls (N = 118) from diverse social backgrounds in Sri Lanka described their views of womanhood. Qualities of the ideal woman considered most important were kindness and honesty, liking children, intelligence, and having a good job. Although the traditional role of the Sri Lankan woman is that of homemaker, most girls in the study (55%) drew the ideal woman working outside the home, often as a teacher or a doctor. Nevertheless, adolescent girls emphasized traditional qualities of the woman at both work and home as self-sacrificing and serving others.

Author(s): 
de Silva, S.
Stiles, D. A.
Gibbons, J. L.
Gibbon, J. L.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry

The construct of resilience was examined in a South Asian community impacted by natural and human-made disasters. Forty-three Sinhala, Tamil, and Muslim Sri Lankans (27 women; age range 21-62 years) participated in 6 focus groups, conducted in either Sinhala or Tamil, to elicit participants' own ideas about components of resilience. Schema analysis of transcripts revealed that although some elements of resilience were common across ethnocultural groups, others differed by ethnic group. The differences appeared to be as much a function of type of trauma exposure as of culture.

Author(s): 
Fernando, Gaithri A.
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Considerable attention is being given to the availability of bodies for anatomical education. This raises the question of the manner in which they are obtained, that is, whether they are unclaimed or donated. With increasing emphasis upon the ethical desirability of using body bequests, the spotlight tends to be focused on those countries with factors that militate against donations. However, little attention has been paid to cultures where donations are readily available. One such country is Sri Lanka where the majority of the Buddhist population follows Theravada Buddhism.

Author(s): 
Subasinghe, Sandeepani Kanchana
Jones, D. Gareth
Publication Title: 
British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Ed.)

A detailed postal questionnaire was sent to 400 general practitioners, hospital doctors, and Ayurvedic practitioners in Sri Lanka as part of a wider study to investigate the delivery of primary medical care. The responses to questions that were related to the Alma Ata recommendations, which aim at providing "health for all by the year 2000," and the perceived health needs of the population are reported. Basic sanitation, clean water, adequate nutrition, and improved health education were considered to be the most important needs.

Author(s): 
Varnam, M. A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

Four systems of traditional medicine have been adopted in Sri Lanka: Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani and Deshiya Chikitsa. The Ayurveda and Deshiya Chikitsa systems use mainly plant and herbal preparations for the treatment of diseases--the former uses about 2000 species, the latter about 500. The plants are used singly or as mixtures. The traditional systems of medicine have a vast literature, mainly in the form of manuscripts. The principle of the Ayurvedic system is to consider the body as a whole, ailments of different organs not being treated separately as in modern medicine.

Author(s): 
Weragoda, P. B.
Publication Title: 
Planned Parenthood Review
Author(s): 
Groot, H. C.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Over one-third of the doctors in Sri Lanka are involved in the delivery of PHC. They form one of seven categories of PHC workers--others being the ayurveda physician, the assistant medical practitioner, nurse, midwife, traditional healer and unqualified practitioner. PHC workers function either in the government or private sector. Their functions in the PHC system are not defined and are dependent on state health policies and people's expectations of health care. The secondary and tertiary levels of the health system are managed by the government through a network of hospitals.

Author(s): 
Fernando, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Author(s): 
Middelkoop, T. B.
Labadie, R. P.

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