Staff Development

Publication Title: 
Frontiers of Health Services Management

SSM Health Care (SSMHC), the first healthcare recipient of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, has been cited by both Baldrige and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations as having a culture of continuous quality improvement (CQI). SSM Health Care began to implement CQI systemwide in 1990. CQI provided the foundation for other strategies that served to further weave quality improvement into the fabric of the organization's culture.

Author(s): 
Sr Mary Jean Ryan, null
Publication Title: 
Radiology Management

Through an employee survey administered at Kaweah Delta Health Care District (KDHCD) in Visalia, Calif., several sources of dissatisfaction were noted, including communication, equipment, staffing and rapid growth. Perceiving no real movement toward resolving these issues, employees vented their frustrations to administration. As director of imaging services, I enlisted the help of two inside consultants, KDHCD's director of education and the director of the Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

Author(s): 
Edge, Roberta M.
Publication Title: 
Radiology Management

Through an employee survey administered at Kaweah Delta Health Care District (KDHCD) in Visalia, Calif., several sources of dissatisfaction were noted, including communication, equipment, staffing and rapid growth. Perceiving no real movement toward resolving these issues, employees vented their frustrations to administration. As director of imaging services, I enlisted the help of two inside consultants, KDHCD's director of education and the director of the Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

Author(s): 
Edge, Roberta M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association

The motives for the selection of primary patients in a neonatal intensive care unit were identified by 34 participants in a series of staff development programs on primary nursing. Motives were identified and ranked in order of importance. These included: (1) medical problems; (2) continuity of care; (3) impression of parents; (4) impression of the infant; (5) altruism; (6) nurses' self-esteem; and (7) impression of other staff. This paper considers the potential impact of these motives on the ability of the nurse to fulfill the expectations of primary nursing practice.

Author(s): 
Lind, R. F.
Sterk, M. B.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Leadership in improving the education of doctors, while impressive, is not happening fast enough. While there are many obstacles, there is no time to waste in restructuring medical education to repair its present deficiencies, for otherwise outside forces could overwhelm today's education leaders with imperatives to make improvements on their own terms. The first step in addressing present shortcomings is to establish measurable objectives for the education of doctors that are aligned with the legitimate expectations of society and the enduring precepts of the medical profession.

Author(s): 
Cohen, J. J.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Cancer Care

A small clinical supervision group consisting of five hospice nurses met together in their workplace 1 h weekly for 12 weeks. Issues concerning professional practice were examined with the help of a researcher (A.J.) who acted as facilitator. At the end of the group's life A.J. asked all nurses to complete a questionnaire related to the workplace and 12 identified helpful factors. Two weeks later the hospice nurses were interviewed in group format and asked to consider the reasons for their choice of answers.

Author(s): 
Jones, A.
Publication Title: 
Nurse Education Today

This study reports the results of a qualitative study involving a large and longstanding online nurse listserv in the United States. A sample of 27 critical care and advanced-practice nurse practitioners was interviewed using semi-structured individual interviews.

Author(s): 
Hew, Khe Foon
Hara, Noriko
Publication Title: 
Malaria Journal

BACKGROUND: Deployment of highly effective artemisinin-based combination therapy for treating uncomplicated malaria calls for better targeting of malaria treatment to improve case management and minimize drug pressure for selecting resistant parasites. The Integrated Management of Malaria curriculum was developed to train multi-disciplinary teams of clinical, laboratory and health information assistants. METHODS: Evaluation of training was conducted in nine health facilities that were Uganda Malaria Surveillance Programme (UMSP) sites.

Author(s): 
Namagembe, Allen
Ssekabira, Umaru
Weaver, Marcia R.
Blum, Nancy
Burnett, Sarah
Dorsey, Grant
Sebuyira, Lydia Mpanga
Ojaku, Alex
Schneider, Gisela
Willis, Kelly
Yeka, Adoke
Publication Title: 
MGMA connexion / Medical group Management Association

As many medical practice administrators focus on the proper care and feeding of their organizations, they've developed the same ailment as other "caregivers"--they tend to their own professional development and needs as an afterthought. But as any self-preserving caregiver can tell you, nurturing yourself actually helps those you serve. How should administrators balance and respond to their own goals and preferences and their organization's needs--while anticipating changes in the broader environment?

Author(s): 
Pope, Christina
Publication Title: 
Hospitals & health networks / AHA

Some people call it the hardest job in health care, and hospitals are pulling out all the stops to make sure they choose the best nurse managers and then help them thrive.

Author(s): 
Thrall, Terese Hudson

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