State Health Plans

Publication Title: 
Southern Medical Journal

BACKGROUND: Mississippi was selected as a pilot state in the national breastfeeding promotion campaign titled Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work (LSMBW). To reinforce the national LSMBW project, the Mississippi Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Breastfeeding Promotion Project Team developed a comprehensive program that included patient and family education, staff training, public awareness activities, health professional outreach, and partnerships with the community. The program also implemented a breastfeeding-friendly clinic environment project and a videotape project.

Author(s): 
Mitra, Amal K.
Khoury, Amal J.
Carothers, Cathy
Foretich, Camille
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Public Health

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of poverty, program generosity, and health on state variations in enrollment of children and adolescents in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program during recent program expansions. METHODS: The relationship of state SSI rates for 1989 and 1992 to child poverty, health, and program generosity were determined by multiple regression. RESULTS: The mean percentage of children enrolled grew from 0.36% (1989) to 0.75% (1992). Poverty rates accounted for 78% of the variance among states in 1989 and 53% in 1992.

Author(s): 
Perrin, J. M.
Ettner, S. L.
McLaughlin, T. J.
Gortmaker, S. L.
Bloom, S. R.
Kuhlthau, K.
Publication Title: 
Inquiry: A Journal of Medical Care Organization, Provision and Financing

This paper examines the effect of changing state policy, such as Medicaid eligibility, payment generosity, and HMO enrollment on provision of hospital uncompensated care. Using national data from the American Hospital Association for the period 1990 through 1995, we find that not-for-profit and public hospitals' uncompensated care levels respond positively to Medicaid payment generosity, although the magnitude of the effect is small. Not-for-profit hospitals respond negatively to Medicaid HMO penetration.

Author(s): 
Davidoff, A. J.
LoSasso, A. T.
Bazzoli, G. J.
Zuckerman, S.
Publication Title: 
Medical care research and review: MCRR

There is substantial variation in the generosity of public assistance programs that affect HIV+ patients, and these differences should affect the economic outcomes associated with HIV infection. This article uses data from a nationally representative sample of HIV+ patients to assess how differences across states in Medicaid and AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAP) affect costs and labor market outcomes for HIV+ patients in care in that state.

Author(s): 
Goldman, D. P.
Bhattacharya, J.
Leibowitz, A. A.
Joyce, G. F.
Shapiro, M. F.
Bozzette, S. A.
Publication Title: 
Medical care research and review: MCRR

This article describes changes in the extent of public health insurance coverage for low-income children and adults from 1979 through 2001. Although previous research has demonstrated that public coverage among children has increased substantially during the past 20 years, our work shows that almost all of the increase has occurred among children in families with incomes between 100% and 200% of the federal poverty level (FPL), with little change among children in families with incomes below 100% of FPL.

Author(s): 
Gilmer, Todd
Kronick, Richard
Rice, Thomas
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law

While Congress debated prescription drug coverage for more than a decade before amending the Medicare program in 2003, thirty-one states provided such benefits to their citizens. Why were the same special interests that were reputedly so effective in delaying prescription drug coverage at the national level seemingly incapable of stopping the majority of states from passing the same kinds of legislation?

Author(s): 
Gray, Virginia
Lowery, David
Godwin, Erik K.
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences

OBJECTIVE: States vary greatly in their support for home- and community-based services (HCBS) that are intended to help disabled seniors live in the community. This article examines how states' generosity in providing HCBS affects the risk of nursing home admission among older Americans and how family availability moderates such effects. METHODS: We conducted discrete time survival analysis of first long-term (90 or more days) nursing home admissions that occurred between 1995 and 2002, using Health and Retirement Study panel data from respondents born in 1923 or earlier.

Author(s): 
Muramatsu, Naoko
Yin, Hongjun
Campbell, Richard T.
Hoyem, Ruby L.
Jacob, Martha A.
Ross, Christopher O.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Managed Care

OBJECTIVE: To compare the generosity and consistency of 10 states' Medicaid preferred drug lists (PDLs) in high-volume therapeutic classes. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive comparisons of 7 of the top 10 therapeutic classes by Medicaid sales and of the top 10 most populous states with Medicaid PDLs. METHODS: A PDL specifies which drugs are available to patients without receiving prior approval from the state. State PDLs were collected in January 2008 to determine the status (covered or not covered) of 110 different drugs in each state.

Author(s): 
Ketcham, Jonathan D.
Ngai, Jeffrey K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Washington was the first state to require insurance companies to cover all categories of licensed providers. The purpose of this paper was to examine the effect of Washington's law on coverage decisions of major health plans. DESIGN: The study uses literature and document review as well as key informant interviews. SETTINGS/LOCATION: The study focuses on legislation and other legal activity in the state of Washington. The key informant interviews are focused on the decisions of three major health plans.

Author(s): 
Watts, Carolyn A.
Lafferty, William E.
Baden, Andrea Corage
Publication Title: 
The Milbank Quarterly

This article has summarized research and policy activities undertaken in Washington State over the past several years to identify the key problems that result in poor quality and excessive disability among injured workers, and the types of system and delivery changes that could best address these problems in order to improve the quality of occupational health care provided through the workers' compensation system.

Author(s): 
Wickizer, T. M.
Franklin, G.
Plaeger-Brockway, R.
Mootz, R. D.

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