Students, Medical

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: High levels of stress have been identified in medical students and increasingly in other health profession student population groups. As stress can affect psychological well-being and interfere with learning and clinical performance, there is a clear argument for universities to include health professional student well-being as an outcome in core curriculum. Mindfulness training is a potential construct to manage stress and enhance academic success.

Author(s): 
McConville, Janet
McAleer, Rachael
Hahne, Andrew
Publication Title: 
Medical Teacher

INTRODUCTION: This literature review summarizes the current evidence on educational interventions to develop healthcare worker resilience. METHODS: Electronic databases were systematically searched using the search terms: education OR training OR medical students AND resilience. The initial search was refined using criteria including population (healthcare students and professionals), interventions (educational), and outcome (resilience changes). RESULTS: Resilience has been defined and measured in various ways.

Author(s): 
Rogers, David
Publication Title: 
Academic Psychiatry: The Journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: Because medical students experience a considerable amount of stress during training, academic leaders have recognized the importance of developing stress-management programs for medical students. The authors set out to identify all controlled trials of stress-management interventions and determine the efficacy of those interventions. METHOD: The authors searched the published English-language articles on PsycINFO and PubMed, using a combination of the following search terms: stress-management, distress, burnout, coping, medical student, wellness.

Author(s): 
Shiralkar, Malan T.
Harris, Toi B.
Eddins-Folensbee, Florence F.
Coverdale, John H.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease

A significant proportion of physicians and medical trainees experience stress-related anxiety and burnout resulting in increased absenteeism and disability, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased rates of medical errors. A review and meta-analysis was conducted to examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at addressing stress, anxiety, and burnout in physicians and medical trainees. Twelve studies involving 1034 participants were included in three meta-analyses.

Author(s): 
Regehr, Cheryl
Glancy, Dylan
Pitts, Annabel
LeBlanc, Vicki R.
Publication Title: 
Academic Psychiatry: The Journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: Because medical students experience a considerable amount of stress during training, academic leaders have recognized the importance of developing stress-management programs for medical students. The authors set out to identify all controlled trials of stress-management interventions and determine the efficacy of those interventions. METHOD: The authors searched the published English-language articles on PsycINFO and PubMed, using a combination of the following search terms: stress-management, distress, burnout, coping, medical student, wellness.

Author(s): 
Shiralkar, Malan T.
Harris, Toi B.
Eddins-Folensbee, Florence F.
Coverdale, John H.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To explore First Year medical students' rating of CAM therapies following a core teaching session. To determine the influence of student gender and previous experience of CAM and therapist/teacher gender and professional background on ratings. DESIGN: Survey; self-administered questionnaire following a teaching session. SETTING: First Year medical students Behavioural Science module CAM teaching session, University of Birmingham Medical School, UK. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty (71.0%) students completed a questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Greenfield, S. M.
Innes, M. A.
Allan, T. F.
Wearn, A. M.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: There is a growing need for students and practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine to gain experience with standardized data collection, patient outcomes measurement, and practice-based research. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a process for standardized data collection that could eventually be adopted for clinical, research, and quality assurance purposes. SETTINGS/LOCATION: The setting for this study was an acupuncture and Oriental medicine teaching clinic in Bloomington, Minnesota.

Author(s): 
Maiers, Michele
McKenzie, Eileen
Evans, Roni
McKenzie, Mark

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