Survivors

Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among adults scheduled to, or actively undergoing, cancer treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched through November 2011. In addition, the authors searched PubMed's related article feature, trial registries, and reference lists of included trials and related reviews. DATA SYNTHESIS: 56 trials with 4,826 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors experience numerous disease and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures for cancer survivorship. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL and HRQoL domains among adult post-treatment cancer survivors.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Geigle, Paula M.
Berlanstein, Debra R.
Topaloglu, Ozlem
Gotay, Carolyn C.
Snyder, Claire
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: People with cancer undergoing active treatment experience numerous disease- and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures of cancer survivorship, both during and after the end of active treatment for cancer. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL outcomes and specific HRQoL domains among adults with cancer during active treatment.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula M.
Berlanstein, Debra R.
Topaloglu, Ozlem
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among cancer survivors who have completed primary treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched from inception (dates varied) to October 2011. The authors also identified eligible trials through a search of additional sources. DATA SYNTHESIS: 40 trials with 3,694 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess whether quality of life (QOL) improved in cancer survivors who had undertaken a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) intervention, compared to cancer survivors who had not. METHODS: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was undertaken. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched from 1990 to 2012. Search terms incorporating the concepts of cancer survivors, QOL and various types of CAM were used.

Author(s): 
Shneerson, Catherine
Taskila, Taina
Gale, Nicola
Greenfield, Sheila
Chen, Yen-Fu
Publication Title: 
BMC cancer

BACKGROUND: Many breast cancer patients and survivors use yoga to cope with their disease. The aim of this review was to systematically assess and meta-analyze the evidence for effects of yoga on health-related quality of life and psychological health in breast cancer patients and survivors. METHODS: MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, CAMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were screened through February 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing yoga to controls were analyzed when they assessed health-related quality of life or psychological health in breast cancer patients or survivors.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lange, Silke
Klose, Petra
Paul, Anna
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Fatigue is one of the most frequently reported, distressing side effects reported by cancer survivors and often has significant long-term consequences. Research indicates that yoga can produce invigorating effects on physical and mental energy, and thereby may improve levels of fatigue. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the literature that reports the effects of randomized, controlled yoga interventions on self-reported fatigue in cancer patients and survivors.

Author(s): 
Sadja, Julie
Mills, Paul J.
Publication Title: 
BMC cancer

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to systematically review the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to conduct a meta-analysis of the effects of yoga on physical and psychosocial outcomes in cancer patients and survivors. METHODS: A systematic literature search in ten databases was conducted in November 2011. Studies were included if they had an RCT design, focused on cancer patients or survivors, included physical postures in the yoga program, compared yoga with a non-exercise or waitlist control group, and evaluated physical and/or psychosocial outcomes.

Author(s): 
Buffart, Laurien M.
van Uffelen, Jannique G. Z.
Riphagen, Ingrid I.
Brug, Johannes
van Mechelen, Willem
Brown, Wendy J.
Chinapaw, Mai J. M.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: It is estimated that up to 75% of cancer survivors may experience cognitive impairment as a result of cancer treatment and given the increasing size of the cancer survivor population, the number of affected people is set to rise considerably in coming years. There is a need, therefore, to identify effective, non-pharmacological interventions for maintaining cognitive function or ameliorating cognitive impairment among people with a previous cancer diagnosis.

Author(s): 
Treanor, Charlene J.
McMenamin, Una C.
O'Neill, Roisin F.
Cardwell, Chris R.
Clarke, Mike J.
Cantwell, Marie
Donnelly, Michael
Publication Title: 
Current Oncology Reports

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of our critical examination is to present results and provide a synthesis of this body of work. RECENT FINDINGS: Sleep problems among cancer survivors are gaining research attention. To our knowledge, there have been six randomized control trials published from 2013 to 2015 that test the effects of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) on sleep as a primary or secondary outcome. Our examination of the literature highlights important methodological issues and variability among trials.

Author(s): 
Christodoulou, Georgia
Black, David S.

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