Symptoms

Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. METHODS: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Danhauer, Suzanne C.
Addington, Elizabeth L.
Sohl, Stephanie J.
Chaoul, Alejandro
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. METHODS: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Danhauer, Suzanne C.
Addington, Elizabeth L.
Sohl, Stephanie J.
Chaoul, Alejandro
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric Research

The interaction of genetic and environmental factors may affect the course and development of psychotic disorders. We examined whether the effects of childhood trauma on cognition and symptoms in schizophrenia were moderated by the Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val(158)Met polymorphism, a common genetic variant known to affect cognition and prefrontal dopamine levels. Participants were 429 schizophrenia/schizoaffective cases from the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank (ASRB).

Author(s): 
Green, Melissa J.
Chia, T.-Yunn
Cairns, Murray J.
Wu, Jingqin
Tooney, Paul A.
Scott, Rodney J.
Carr, Vaughan J.
Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank
Publication Title: 
Health Psychology

A study by R. J. Contrada et al. (2004; see record 2004-13299-001) suggested that religious involvement affects recovery from coronary artery bypass graft surgery. This finding makes a significant contribution to the growing literature on the role of religion in health and illness, yet it is unlikely to have a comparable impact on coronary artery bypass graft surgery research. Why? What determines the importance of psychosocial predictors of medical outcomes? How can health psychologists increase the impact of biopsychosocial research?

Author(s): 
Freedland, Kenneth E.
Publication Title: 
Health Psychology

This article reports a prospective study of religiousness and recovery from heart surgery. Religiousness and other psychosocial factors were assessed in 142 patients about a week prior to surgery. Those with stronger religious beliefs subsequently had fewer complications and shorter hospital stays, the former effect mediating the latter. Attendance at religious services was unrelated to complications but predicted longer hospitalizations. Prayer was not related to recovery. Depressive symptoms were associated with longer hospital stays.

Author(s): 
Contrada, Richard J.
Goyal, Tanya M.
Cather, Corinne
Rafalson, Luba
Idler, Ellen L.
Krause, Tyrone J.
Subscribe to RSS - Symptoms