systematic reviews

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: The aim of this article is to summarize and critically evaluate the evidence from systematic reviews (SRs) of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for lowering blood lipid levels (BLL). METHODS: Eight electronic databases were searched until March 2016. Additionally, all the retrieved references were inspected manually for further relevant papers. Systematic reviews were considered eligible, if they included patients of any age and/or gender with elevated blood lipid levels using any type of CAM.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, Paul
Albedah, Abdullah M. N.
Khalil, Mohamed M. K.
AlQaed, Meshari S.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. Revue Canadienne De Psychiatrie

BACKGROUND: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. METHODS: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence.

Author(s): 
Ravindran, Arun V.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Faulkner, Guy
Ortiz, Abigail
McIntosh, Diane
Morehouse, Rachel L.
Ravindran, Lakshmi
Yatham, Lakshmi N.
Kennedy, Sidney H.
Lam, Raymond W.
MacQueen, Glenda M.
Milev, Roumen V.
Parikh, Sagar V.
CANMAT Depression Work Group
Publication Title: 
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. Revue Canadienne De Psychiatrie

BACKGROUND: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. METHODS: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence.

Author(s): 
Ravindran, Arun V.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Faulkner, Guy
Ortiz, Abigail
McIntosh, Diane
Morehouse, Rachel L.
Ravindran, Lakshmi
Yatham, Lakshmi N.
Kennedy, Sidney H.
Lam, Raymond W.
MacQueen, Glenda M.
Milev, Roumen V.
Parikh, Sagar V.
CANMAT Depression Work Group
Publication Title: 
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. Revue Canadienne De Psychiatrie

BACKGROUND: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) has revised its 2009 guidelines for the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults by updating the evidence and recommendations. The target audiences for these 2016 guidelines are psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. METHODS: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence.

Author(s): 
Parikh, Sagar V.
Quilty, Lena C.
Ravitz, Paula
Rosenbluth, Michael
Pavlova, Barbara
Grigoriadis, Sophie
Velyvis, Vytas
Kennedy, Sidney H.
Lam, Raymond W.
MacQueen, Glenda M.
Milev, Roumen V.
Ravindran, Arun V.
Uher, Rudolf
CANMAT Depression Work Group
Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic, debilitating pain disorder. Dissatisfaction with conventional medicine can lead people with FM to turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Two previous overviews of systematic reviews of CAM for FM have been published, but they did not assessed for risk of bias in the review process. METHODS: Five databases Medline, Embase, AMED (via OVID), Web of Science and Central were searched from their inception to December 2015. Reference lists were hand-searched.

Author(s): 
Perry, Rachel
Leach, Verity
Davies, Philippa
Penfold, Chris
Ness, Andy
Churchill, Rachel
Publication Title: 
Acupuncture in Medicine: Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society

BACKGROUND: In trials, 'therapist intensive' complex interventions are typically delivered over time, during which a relationship between the practitioner and participant may develop. Such relationships are sometimes criticised as obscuring any 'true' treatment effect. Limiting interactions is one strategy that might be used to try to control for the effect of a therapeutic relationship.

Author(s): 
Prady, Stephanie L.
Burch, Jane
Crouch, Simon
MacPherson, Hugh
Publication Title: 
Acupuncture in Medicine: Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society

BACKGROUND: Vascular mild cognitive impairment (VMCI) is the most common type of vascular cognitive impairment induced by cerebrovascular disease. No effective medicines are currently available for VMCI. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for VMCI. METHODS: Seven electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials which investigated the effects of acupuncture compared with no treatment, placebo or conventional therapies on cognitive function or other clinical outcomes in patients with VMCI.

Author(s): 
Cao, Huijuan
Wang, Yuyi
Chang, Dennis
Zhou, Li
Liu, Jianping
Publication Title: 
Acupuncture in Medicine: Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society

OBJECTIVE: Although there is a growing interest in the use of acupuncture during pregnancy, the safety of acupuncture is yet to be rigorously investigated. The objective of this review is to identify adverse events (AEs) associated with acupuncture treatment during pregnancy. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) and five Korean databases up to February 2013.

Author(s): 
Park, Jimin
Sohn, Youngjoo
White, Adrian R.
Lee, Hyangsook
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: Reviews of maternity services highlight the need for a reduction of medical interventions for women with low risk pregnancies and births to prevent the potential cascade of interventions and their associated risks. Complementary medicines (CM) such as acupuncture and acupressure have claimed to be effective in reducing interventions in labour; however, systematic reviews of evidence to date are conflicting.

Author(s): 
Levett, K. M.
Smith, C. A.
Dahlen, H. G.
Bensoussan, A.
Publication Title: 
Acupuncture in Medicine: Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society

BACKGROUND: Acupuncture analgesia has been evaluated by a number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs); however, a systematic summary of reporting quality of RCTs in this specific field is lacking. OBJECTIVE: To examine the reporting characteristics and risk of bias of RCTs of acupuncture analgesia indexed in the PubMed database. METHODS: A PubMed search of RCTs of acupuncture analgesia was conducted through November 2015. The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the risk of bias of each trial.

Author(s): 
Li, Xiuxia
Wang, Rong
Shi, Xiue
Chen, Zehao
Pan, Yuanqing
Li, Xusheng
Yang, Kehu

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