Tamoxifen

Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years.

Author(s): 
Hill, D. Ashley
Crider, Mark
Hill, Susan R.
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years.

Author(s): 
Hill, D. Ashley
Crider, Mark
Hill, Susan R.
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years.

Author(s): 
Hill, D. Ashley
Crider, Mark
Hill, Susan R.
Publication Title: 
Laboratory Investigation; a Journal of Technical Methods and Pathology

The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states.

Author(s): 
Hull, Travis D.
Bolisetty, Subhashini
DeAlmeida, Angela C.
Litovsky, Silvio H.
Prabhu, Sumanth D.
Agarwal, Anupam
George, James F.
Publication Title: 
Carcinogenesis

The objective of this work was to determine the interactive effects between soy bioactive components and tamoxifen (TAM) on prevention of estrogen-dependent breast cancer (BRCA). We initially investigated the effects of soy isoflavone genistein and TAM on the growth and cell cycle progression of estrogen-dependent MCF-7 human BRCA cells, and on the expression of ERalpha, pS2 and EGFR genes in vitro. Genistein or TAM alone inhibited the growth of MCF-7 cells in part via G(1) phase arrest, but their combinations showed suggestive antagonistic effects.

Author(s): 
Mai, Zhiming
Blackburn, George L.
Zhou, Jin-Rong
Publication Title: 
Molecular Carcinogenesis

Although tamoxifen (TAM) is used for the front-line treatment and prevention of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast tumors, nearly 40% of estrogen-dependent breast tumors do not respond to TAM treatment. Moreover, the positive response is usually of short duration, and most tumors eventually develop TAM-resistance. Overexpression of HER2 gene is associated with TAM-resistance of breast tumor, and suppression of HER2 expression enhances the TAM activity. Soy isoflavone genistein has been shown to have anti-cancer activities and suppress expression of HER2 and ERalpha.

Author(s): 
Mai, Zhiming
Blackburn, George L.
Zhou, Jin-Rong
Publication Title: 
Glia

Steroidal estrogens can regulate inflammatory immune responses and may be involved in the suppression of multiple sclerosis (MS) during pregnancy. However, the risks and side effects associated with steroidal estrogens may limit their usefulness for long-term MS therapy. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) could provide an alternative therapeutic strategy, because they behave as estrogen agonists in some tissues, but are either inert or behave like estrogen antagonists in other tissues.

Author(s): 
Bebo, Bruce F.
Dehghani, Babak
Foster, Scott
Kurniawan, Astrid
Lopez, Francisco J.
Sherman, Larry S.
Publication Title: 
Oncogene

Many estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers respond well initially to endocrine therapies, but often develop resistance during treatment with selective ER modulators (SERMs) such as tamoxifen. We have reported that the 14-3-3 family member and conserved protein, 14-3-3ζ, is upregulated by tamoxifen and that high expression correlated with an early time to disease recurrence. However, the mechanism by which tamoxifen upregulates 14-3-3ζ and may promote the development of endocrine resistance is not known.

Author(s): 
Bergamaschi, A.
Katzenellenbogen, B. S.
Publication Title: 
Breast cancer research: BCR

INTRODUCTION: Despite the benefits of estrogen receptor (ER)-targeted endocrine therapies in breast cancer, many tumors develop resistance. 14-3-3 ζ/YWHAZ, a member of the 14-3-3 family of conserved proteins, is over-expressed in several types of cancer, and our previous work showed that high expression of 14-3-3ζ in ER-positive breast cancers was associated with a poor clinical outcome for women on tamoxifen. Therefore, we now probe the role of 14-3-3ζ in endocrine resistance, and we examine the functional dimensions and molecular basis that underlie 14-3-3ζ activities.

Author(s): 
Bergamaschi, Anna
Christensen, Barbara L.
Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.
Publication Title: 
Carcinogenesis

The present study examined the effect of dietary genistein, a soy isoflavone, on breast cancer patients who take tamoxifen, an antiestrogen treatment, using a preclinical model. The interaction of various doses of genistein with tamoxifen on the growth of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer MCF-7 cells was investigated by subcutaneously injecting MCF-7 cells into the flank of ovariectomized athymic mice.

Author(s): 
Du, Mengyuan
Yang, Xujuan
Hartman, James A.
Cooke, Paul S.
Doerge, Daniel R.
Ju, Young H.
Helferich, William G.

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