Telephone

Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Spiritual practice and beliefs related to healing are described using data from a telephone survey. Questions in the survey address the practice of prayer and spiritual beliefs related to healing. Questions explore belief in miracles, that God acts through religious healers, the importance of God's will in healing, and that God acts through physicians. Questions also ask whether people discuss spiritual concerns with their physician and whether they would want to if seriously ill.

Author(s): 
Mansfield, Christopher J.
Mitchell, Jim
King, Dana E.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Spiritual practice and beliefs related to healing are described using data from a telephone survey. Questions in the survey address the practice of prayer and spiritual beliefs related to healing. Questions explore belief in miracles, that God acts through religious healers, the importance of God's will in healing, and that God acts through physicians. Questions also ask whether people discuss spiritual concerns with their physician and whether they would want to if seriously ill.

Author(s): 
Mansfield, Christopher J.
Mitchell, Jim
King, Dana E.
Publication Title: 
Southern Medical Journal

BACKGROUND: Although prayer and other spiritual practices are common among residents of the rural south, the use of faith-based healers (FBH), or healers who use prayer as their primary healing modality, has not been explored in this population. METHODS: Secondary data analysis from a random digit dialing telephone survey of rural adults in eight southern states. RESULTS: Our overall response rate was 51% and 193 subjects (4.1%) had seen an FBH practitioner within the previous year.

Author(s): 
Hull, Sharon K.
Daaleman, Timothy P.
Thaker, Samruddhi
Pathman, Donald E.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

CONTEXT: A growing number of complementary and alternative therapies are eligible for reimbursement by third party payers in the United States. No studies have examined current trends in the use of public funds for the payment of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). OBJECTIVE: To determine the reimbursement polices of state Medicaid programs for CAM. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: 46 state Medicaid reimbursement specialists. INTERVENTION: Telephone survey.

Author(s): 
Steyer, Terrence E.
Freed, Gary L.
Lantz, Paula M.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Trials (London, England)

BACKGROUND: Traditional recruitment methods for clinical trials, such as telephone, mail, and print media, are often inefficient, costly, and use large amounts of staff time and resources. PURPOSE: This analysis was conducted to determine whether retention, demographics, and outcomes differed between enrolled participants who responded to recruitment outreach using an Internet-based information and registration system and enrollees whose first contact was with study staff via telephone.

Author(s): 
Funk, Kristine L.
Elder, Charles R.
Lindberg, Nangel M.
Gullion, Christina M.
Debar, Lynn L.
Meltesen, Gayle
Stevens, Victor J.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Behavioral Medicine: A Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine

BACKGROUND: The reduction in adrenergic activity and anxiety associated with meditation may be beneficial for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators. PURPOSE: This study aims to determine the feasibility of a phone-delivered mindfulness intervention in patients with defibrillators and to obtain preliminary indications of efficacy on mindfulness and anxiety. METHODS: Clinically stable outpatients were randomized to a mindfulness intervention (eight weekly individual phone sessions) or to a scripted follow-up phone call.

Author(s): 
Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena
Crawford, Sybil L.
Carmody, James
Rosenthal, Lawrence
Yeh, Gloria
Stanley, Mary
Rose, Karen
Browning, Clifford
Ockene, Ira S.
Publication Title: 
Medical Education Online

BACKGROUND: To encourage medical students' use of patient-centered skills in core clerkships, we implemented and evaluated a Telephone Follow-up Curriculum focusing on three communication behaviors: tailoring education to patients' level of understanding, promoting adherence by anticipating obstacles, and ensuring comprehension by having patients repeat the plans. METHODS: The intervention group consisted of two different cohorts of third-year medical students in longitudinal clerkships (n=41); traditional clerkship students comprised the comparison group (n = 185).

Author(s): 
Saba, George W.
Chou, Calvin L.
Satterfield, Jason
Teherani, Arianne
Hauer, Karen
Poncelet, Ann
Chen, Huiju Carrie
Publication Title: 
AIDS care

To reduce non-injection drug use (NIDU) among HIV primary care patients, more than a single brief intervention may be needed, but clinic resources are often too limited for extended interventions. To extend brief motivational interviewing (MI) to reduce NIDU, we designed and conducted a pilot study of "HealthCall," consisting of brief (1-3 minutes) daily patient calls reporting NIDU and health behaviors to a telephone-based interactive voice response (IVR) system, which provided data for subsequent personalized feedback.

Author(s): 
Aharonovich, Efrat
Greenstein, Eliana
O'Leary, Ann
Johnston, Barbara
Seol, Simone G.
Hasin, Deborah S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: This study documents the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), among White, African American, and Hispanic/Latina women living in New York City. A pilot to a national survey of CAM use among American women, this study explores women's use of categories of CAM and various CAM practitioners, racial and ethnic differences in CAM use, and women's perceptions regarding the effectiveness of CAM. DESIGN AND LOCATION: Data were collected from women residing in New York City using random digit dialing/computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI).

Author(s): 
Factor-Litvak, P.
Cushman, L. F.
Kronenberg, F.
Wade, C.
Kalmuss, D.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Public Health

In this study, data collected in 1989 in a random-digit dialing telephone survey of 60,590 adults in 38 states and the District of Columbia were analyzed. Approximately 38% of women and 24% of men reported that they were currently trying to lose weight. Methods reported were counting calories (24% of women, 14% of men), participating in organized weight loss programs (10%, 3%), taking special supplements (10%, 7%), taking diet pills (4%, 2%), and fasting for 24 hours or longer (5%, 5%).

Author(s): 
Serdula, M. K.
Williamson, D. F.
Anda, R. F.
Levy, A.
Heaton, A.
Byers, T.

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