Terminal Care

Publication Title: 
BMJ case reports

This is a complex case of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with comorbid panic disorder occurring in a woman in her mid-60s, with a family history of neurotic illness. PTSD arose in the context of treatment for terminal lung cancer. This patient who had been close to her father watched him die of cancer, when he was about her age. Her diagnosis and treatment prompted traumatic recollections of her father's illness and death that resulted in her voluntary withdrawal from cancer treatment.

Author(s): 
Udo, Itoro
Gash, Amanda
Publication Title: 
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine

The elderly, terminally ill patient often experiences physical, emotional, and spiritual pain. While pharmacology remains the cornerstone of pain management, non-pharmacologic methods can serve as adjuncts for pain relief, and also serve to enhance the overall quality of the patient's life. Neurostimulation, such as TENS unit, acupuncture, and massage, are based on the gate theory of pain control. These treatments can be useful particularly in muscular pain.

Author(s): 
Urba, S. G.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)

Aromatherapy is often misunderstood and consequently somewhat marginalized. Because of a basic misinterpretation, the integration of aromatherapy into UK hospitals is not moving forward as quickly as it might. Aromatherapy in UK is primarily aimed at enhancing patient care or improving patient satisfaction, and it is frequently mixed with massage.

Author(s): 
Buckle, Jane
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To characterize oncology nurses' attitudes toward care at the end of life (EOL) and their experiences in caring for terminally ill patients, hospice discussions with patients and families, and the use of palliative care practices. DESIGN: Descriptive correlational survey study. SETTING: A Magnet�-designated hospital in southern California with more than 500 beds. SAMPLE: 31 oncology nurses. METHODS: Nurses completed the adapted version of the Caring for Terminally Ill Patients Nurse Survey.

Author(s): 
Boyd, Denise
Merkh, Kristen
Rutledge, Dana N.
Randall, Victoria
Publication Title: 
Pflege Zeitschrift
Author(s): 
Luz-Bissmaier, Angelika
Publication Title: 
Palliative & Supportive Care

OBJECTIVE: One of the most important goals of palliative care is achieving a good death. Most Japanese believe that �having some pleasure in daily life� is necessary at the end of life. The aim of this study was to identify, from the perspective of physicians and nurses, a care strategy that ensures that cancer patients have pleasure in daily life at the end of life. METHOD: We conducted semistructured interviews with experts in palliative care units. A total of 45 participants included 22 palliative care physicians and 23 nurses.

Author(s): 
Nakano, Kimiko
Sato, Kazuki
Katayama, Harumi
Miyashita, Mitsunori
Publication Title: 
Beginnings (American Holistic Nurses' Association)
Author(s): 
Pounds, Laraine K.
Publication Title: 
Revue De L'infirmi�re

There are increasing numbers of initiatives in healthcare institutions focusing on the benefits of essential oils. Received positively by patients who appreciate the resulting wellbeing, these innovative approaches around aromatherapy are based on the initiative of pioneering caregivers. Following on from an international congress held each year in Grasse, this article presents some example schemes.

Author(s): 
Sogno-Lalloz, Isabelle
Publication Title: 
Holistic Nursing Practice

BACKGROUND: Spirituality is of particular importance in the lives of many older adults at the end of life. While the role of spirituality may differ among older adults, spirituality may offer a purpose and meaning toward the end of life and provides a framework for managing concerns and decisions at this time. Despite the increasingly evident role of spirituality in the United States, the spirituality of older adults has been neglected. Moreover, little research has been undertaken to determine how nurses may best help older adults improve spiritual health.

Author(s): 
Wallace, Meredith
O'Shea, Eileen
Publication Title: 
Palliative Medicine

The warm welcome for modern advances in the care of the dying should not exclude the past in which there is much to be learned from the skills of our ancestors. A bilingual two-year qualitative research project into traditions associated with dying and death was undertaken. Research began in the archives available in the internationally recognized university folklore departments of Ireland and Scotland.

Author(s): 
Donnelly, S.

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