Terminal Care

Publication Title: 
The Australian Journal of Rural Health

BACKGROUND: Understanding the sociocultural dimension of a patient's health beliefs is critical to a successful clinical encounter. Malaysia with its multi-ethnic population of Malay, Chinese and Indian still uses many forms of traditional health care in spite of a remarkably modern rural health service. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is discuss traditional health care in the context of some of the cultural aspects of health beliefs, perceptions and practices in the different ethnic groups of the author's rural family practices.

Author(s): 
Ariff, Kamil M.
Beng, Khoo S.
Publication Title: 
Hospital Progress

Terminally ill persons and their families will communicate their own prayer needs to healing persons who are attending carefully. A number of guidelines may also be helpful to healers in developing the personal characteristics needed to minister effectively and in determining when and how to pray with patients.

Author(s): 
Lucas, M. A.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Attention to the spiritual dimension of a person is essential in a holistic approach to hospice care. Although other hospice team members may be involved in matters of faith with patients, chaplains are the primary professionals concerned with the transcendent nature of life and the integrative role that spirituality plays in care for the dying. Understanding spirituality in a person's living and dying requires an understanding of religion and theology. Religion is meant to connect us to a caring community and to give us a place on which to stand--a tradition.

Author(s): 
Burns, S.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

To combat physician-assisted suicide, Catholic healthcare and the Catholic community cannot solely focus on mounting campaigns and formulating policies. They must also demonstrate an alternative way to approach death and care of the dying, taking a leadership role in improving end-of-life care. To accomplish this, Catholic healthcare must foster a culture that recognizes death as the inevitable outcome of human life and makes care for the dying as important as care for those who may get well.

Author(s): 
Hamel, R.
Publication Title: 
Palliative Medicine

The warm welcome for modern advances in the care of the dying should not exclude the past in which there is much to be learned from the skills of our ancestors. A bilingual two-year qualitative research project into traditions associated with dying and death was undertaken. Research began in the archives available in the internationally recognized university folklore departments of Ireland and Scotland.

Author(s): 
Donnelly, S.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Internal Medicine

BACKGROUND: Recognizing that many Americans draw on religious or spiritual beliefs when confronted by serious illness, some medical educators have recommended that physicians routinely ask about spirituality or religion when conducting a medical history. The most appropriate wording for such an inquiry remains unknown.

Author(s): 
Ehman, J. W.
Ott, B. B.
Short, T. H.
Ciampa, R. C.
Hansen-Flaschen, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Christian Nursing: A Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Author(s): 
Leaser, M. K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Palliative Medicine

Prayer and religious ceremonies may help patients near the end of life and their relatives find comfort and discover meaning in their lives. In this paper, we analyze how physicians might respond in two situations regarding prayer and religious ceremonies. First, how should physicians respond when such patients or their families ask physicians to pray for them or with them? Physicians' responses to such requests will depend on their own religious and spiritual beliefs, the congruence of their beliefs with those of the patient and family, and their relationship with the patient.

Author(s): 
Lo, Bernard
Kates, Laura W.
Ruston, Delaney
Arnold, Robert M.
Cohen, Cynthia B.
Puchalski, Christina M.
Pantilat, Steven Z.
Rabow, Michael W.
Schreiber, Rabbi Simeon
Tulsky, James A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Palliative Medicine

Prayer and religious ceremonies may help patients near the end of life and their relatives find comfort and discover meaning in their lives. In this paper, we analyze how physicians might respond in two situations regarding prayer and religious ceremonies. First, how should physicians respond when such patients or their families ask physicians to pray for them or with them? Physicians' responses to such requests will depend on their own religious and spiritual beliefs, the congruence of their beliefs with those of the patient and family, and their relationship with the patient.

Author(s): 
Lo, Bernard
Kates, Laura W.
Ruston, Delaney
Arnold, Robert M.
Cohen, Cynthia B.
Puchalski, Christina M.
Pantilat, Steven Z.
Rabow, Michael W.
Schreiber, Rabbi Simeon
Tulsky, James A.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: Our objective with this study was to identify the nature and the role of spirituality from the parents' perspective at the end of life in the PICU and to discern clinical implications. METHODS: A qualitative study based on parental responses to open-ended questions on anonymous, self-administered questionnaires was conducted at 3 PICUs in Boston, Massachusetts. Fifty-six parents whose children had died in PICUs after the withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies participated.

Author(s): 
Robinson, Mary R.
Thiel, Mary Martha
Backus, Meghan M.
Meyer, Elaine C.

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