Terrorism

Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Five studies examined the contribution of attachment style to mortality salience effects. In Study 1, mortality salience led to more severe judgments of transgressions only among anxious-ambivalent and avoidant persons but not among secure persons. In addition, whereas anxious-ambivalent persons showed immediate and delayed increases in severity judgments, avoidant persons showed this response only after a delay period. In Study 2, anxious-ambivalent persons showed immediate and delayed increases in death-thought accessibility after death reminders.

Author(s): 
Mikulincer, M.
Florian, V.
Publication Title: 
The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child

It is common to base an assessment of psychological health on an individual's ability to love. However, the ability to hate is no less important a manifestation of the healthy personality. The author investigates the psychology of hatred and the possible effects of psychoanalytic treatment on the development of the capacity to hate and, by extension, to engage in revolutionary political activity.

Author(s): 
Eissler, K. R.
Publication Title: 
Personality and Social Psychology Review: An Official Journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc

Originally, terror management theory proposed two psychological mechanisms in dealing with the terror of death awareness-cultural worldview validation and self-esteem enhancement. In this article, we would like to promote the idea of close relationships as an additional death-anxiety buffering mechanism and review a growing body of empirical data that support this contention. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the sociocultural and personal functions of close relationships, we formulate two basic hypotheses that have received empirical support in a series of experimental studies.

Author(s): 
Mikulincer, Mario
Florian, Victor
Hirschberger, Gilad
Publication Title: 
The American Psychologist

Jean-Jacques Rousseau's concepts of self-love (amour propre) and love of self (amour de soi mÍme) are applied to the psychology of terrorism. Self-love is concern with one's image in the eyes of respected others, members of one's group. It denotes one's feeling of personal significance, the sense that one's life has meaning in accordance with the values of one's society. Love of self, in contrast, is individualistic concern with self-preservation, comfort, safety, and the survival of self and loved ones.

Author(s): 
Kruglanski, Arie W.
BÈlanger, Jocelyn J.
Gelfand, Michele
Gunaratna, Rohan
Hettiarachchi, Malkanthi
Reinares, Fernando
Orehek, Edward
Sasota, Jo
Sharvit, Keren
Publication Title: 
Psychological Science

Did Americans change following the September 11 terrorist attacks? We provide a tentative answer with respect to the positive traits included in the Values in Action Classification of Strengths and measured with a self-report questionnaire available on-line and completed by 4,817 respondents.

Author(s): 
Peterson, Christopher
Seligman, Martin E. P.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Science

Did Americans change following the September 11 terrorist attacks? We provide a tentative answer with respect to the positive traits included in the Values in Action Classification of Strengths and measured with a self-report questionnaire available on-line and completed by 4,817 respondents.

Author(s): 
Peterson, Christopher
Seligman, Martin E. P.
Publication Title: 
Health Physics

I would like to start this Twenty-Eighth Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture by expressing my gratitude to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) for this unique occasion. I feel particularly honored for this opportunity to address a highly specialized and qualified audience of professionals who are specifically interested in what appears to be a forthcoming worldwide challenge, namely radiological terrorism and managing its potential radiological consequences.

Author(s): 
Gonz·lez, Abel J.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

For decades, public warning messages have been relayed via broadcast information channels, including radio and television; more recently, risk communication channels have expanded to include social media sites, where messages can be easily amplified by user retransmission. This research examines the factors that predict the extent of retransmission for official hazard communications disseminated via Twitter.

Author(s): 
Sutton, Jeannette
Gibson, C. Ben
Phillips, Nolan Edward
Spiro, Emma S.
League, Cedar
Johnson, Britta
Fitzhugh, Sean M.
Butts, Carter T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association

In much of contemporary culture, "trauma" signifies not so much terrible experience as a particular context for understanding and responding to a terrible experience. In therapy, in the media, and in international interventions, the traumatized are seen not simply as people who suffer and so are deserving of concern and aid; they are seen also as people who suffer for us, who are given special dispensation. They are treated with awe if they tell a certain kind of trauma story, and are ignored or vilified if they tell another.

Author(s): 
Reisner, Steven
Publication Title: 
Health Care for Women International

According to terror management theory (TMT), an event that heightens awareness of death produces the need to defend against existential anxiety. The horrifying events of September 11, 2001 (9/11), created an unparalleled opportunity to apply TMT beyond the laboratory. This study examined post-9/11 stress (via perceived stress scale [PSS] scores) and interview responses of a diverse community sample of American midlife women (ages 35-60). Previous studies showed that many women have high stress during midlife, suggesting that 9/11 could have a unique impact on this segment of the U.S.

Author(s): 
Thomas, Sandra

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