Tissue Donors

Publication Title: 
JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports

BACKGROUND: Kidney transplantation has been recognized as the best renal replacement therapy option for people with end stage renal disease. With an estimated 170,000 people waiting for a kidney transplant around the world and a limited supply of donor organs, the waiting time is often prolonged for many years. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to examine the existing evidence of patients' experiences of living on dialysis and waiting for a renal transplant from a deceased donor.

Author(s): 
Burns, Tania
Fernandez, Ritin
Stephens, Moira
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Surgical Research

BACKGROUND: Lifespan extension is achieved through long-term application of dietary restriction (DR), and benefits of short-term dietary restriction on acute stress and inflammation have been observed. So far, the effects of short-term DR in humans are relatively unknown. We hypothesized that short-term DR in humans reduces the acute phase response following a well defined surgical trauma. METHODS: Thirty live kidney donors were randomized between 30% preoperative dietary restriction followed by 1 d of fasting (n=17) or a 4 d ad libitum regimen (n=13) prior to surgery.

Author(s): 
van Ginhoven, Tessa M.
Dik, Willem A.
Mitchell, James R.
Smits-te Nijenhuis, Marja A.
van Holten-Neelen, Conny
Hooijkaas, Herbert
Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.
de Bruin, Ron W. F.
IJzermans, Jan N. M.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. Journal Canadien D'ophtalmologie
Author(s): 
Iqbal, Munir
Hodge, William
Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

Religious discussion of human organs and tissues has concentrated largely on donation for therapeutic purposes. The retrieval and use of human tissue samples in diagnostic, research, and education contexts have, by contrast, received very little direct theological attention. Initially undertaken at the behest of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, this essay seeks to explore the theological and religious questions embedded in nontherapeutic use of human tissue.

Author(s): 
Campbell, Courtney S.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Disagreement over the legitimacy of direct sterilization continues within Catholic moral debate, with painful and at times confusing ramifications for Catholic healthcare systems. This paper argues that the medical profession should be construed as a key moral authority in this debate, on two grounds. First, the recent revival of neo-Aristotelianism in moral philosophy as applied to medical ethics has brought out the inherently moral dimensions of the history and current practice of medicine.

Author(s): 
Cowdin, Daniel M.
Tuohey, John F.
Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

The topic of organ transplantation is examined from the perspective of three authors: Robert Bellah, Jeremy Rifkin, and Margaret Jane Radin. Introduced by reflections on the development of the justification of organ transplantation within the Roman Catholic community and the various themes raised by the historical study in Richard Titmuss's The Gift Relationship, the paper examines how and in what ways the possible commodification of organs will affect our society and the impacts this may have on the supply of organs.

Author(s): 
Shannon, T. A.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

In this article, I address the issue of the sale of human organs and the moral implications of a market in human organs under the aegis of Christian Bioethics. I argue that moral issues of this kind cannot be adequately be addressed from the point of view of moral frameworks, which point exclusively to procedural norms. Rather, a moral perspective must embody some substantive norms derived from a particular content-full moral or theological perspective. This substantive norms to which I appeal in this article are those of Roman Catholicism.

Author(s): 
Capaldi, N.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

With rare exceptions, Roman Catholic moral theologians condemn the sale of human organs for transplantation. Yet, such criticism, while rhetorically powerful, often oversimplifies complex issues. Arguments for the prohibition of a market in human organs may, therefore, depend on a single premise, or a cluster of dubious and allied premises, which when examined cannot hold. In what follows, I will examine the ways in which such arguments are configured.

Author(s): 
Cherry, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This article addresses the ethics of selling transplantable organs. I examine and refute the claim that Catholic teaching would permit and even encourage an organ market. The acceptance of organ transplantation by the Church and even its praise of organ donors should not distract us from the quite explicit Church teaching that condemns an organ market. I offer some reasons why the Church should continue to disapprove of an organ market. The recent commercial turn in medicine can blind us to the problem of an organ market.

Author(s): 
Stempsey, W. E.
Publication Title: 
Transplantation Proceedings

The shortage of organ donations is a major limiting factor in transplant programs. Since a favorable attitude of health professionals to organ donation can positively influence the decision of families of potential donors, educating physicians early in their careers may become crucial in this setting. The aim of this study was to compare medical student opinions on organ donation and transplantation at different stages in their undergraduate career. METHODS: Medical students were prospectively surveyed in their first and fourth years by an anonymous 10-item questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Burra, P.
De Bona, M.
Canova, D.
D'Aloiso, M. C.
Germani, G.
Rumiati, R.
Ermani, M.
Ancona, E.

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