Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Following traumatic brain injury (TBI) there is an increased prevalence of depression compared to the general population. It is unknown whether non-pharmacological interventions for depression are effective for people with TBI. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions for depression in adults and children with TBI at reducing the diagnosis and severity of symptoms of depression. SEARCH METHODS: We ran the most recent search on 11 February 2015.

Author(s): 
Gertler, Paul
Tate, Robyn L.
Cameron, Ian D.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is frequent in persons living with spinal cord injury (SCI). Conventionally, the pain is treated pharmacologically, yet long-term pain medication is often refractory and associated with side effects. Non-pharmacological interventions are frequently advocated, although the benefit and harm profiles of these treatments are not well established, in part because of methodological weaknesses of available studies.

Author(s): 
Boldt, Inga
Eriks-Hoogland, Inge
Brinkhof, Martin W. G.
de Bie, Rob
Joggi, Daniel
von Elm, Erik
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is frequent in persons living with spinal cord injury (SCI). Conventionally, the pain is treated pharmacologically, yet long-term pain medication is often refractory and associated with side effects. Non-pharmacological interventions are frequently advocated, although the benefit and harm profiles of these treatments are not well established, in part because of methodological weaknesses of available studies.

Author(s): 
Boldt, Inga
Eriks-Hoogland, Inge
Brinkhof, Martin W. G.
de Bie, Rob
Joggi, Daniel
von Elm, Erik
Publication Title: 
Stroke

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Central poststroke pain is a chronic neuropathic disorder that follows a stroke. Current research on its management is limited, and no review has evaluated all therapies for central poststroke pain. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to evaluate therapies for central poststroke pain. We identified eligible trials, in any language, by systematic searches of AMED, CENTRAL, CINAHL, DARE, EMBASE, HealthSTAR, MEDLINE, and PsychINFO.

Author(s): 
Mulla, Sohail M.
Wang, Li
Khokhar, Rabia
Izhar, Zain
Agarwal, Arnav
Couban, Rachel
Buckley, D. Norman
Moulin, Dwight E.
Panju, Akbar
Makosso-Kallyth, Sun
Turan, Alparslan
Montori, Victor M.
Sessler, Daniel I.
Thabane, Lehana
Guyatt, Gordon H.
Busse, Jason W.
Publication Title: 
Neuropsychologia

Many human behaviours and pathologies have been attributed to the putative mirror neuron system, a neural system that is active during both the observation and execution of actions. While there are now a very large number of papers on the mirror neuron system, variations in the methods and analyses employed by researchers mean that the basic characteristics of the mirror response are not clear. This review focuses on three important aspects of the mirror response, as measured by modulations in corticospinal excitability: (1) muscle specificity; (2) direction; and (3) timing of modulation.

Author(s): 
Naish, Katherine R.
Houston-Price, Carmel
Bremner, Andrew J.
Holmes, Nicholas P.
Publication Title: 
Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society

Psychogenic paralysis presents a real treatment challenge. Despite psychotherapy, physiotherapy, antidepressants, acupuncture, or hypnosis, the outcome is not always satisfactory with persistent symptoms after long-term follow-up. We conducted a retrospective study to assess clinical features and to propose an alternative treatment based on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Seventy patients (44 F/26 M, mean age: 24.7 +/- 16.6 years) experienced paraparesis (57%), monoparesis (37%), tetraparesis (3%), or hemiparesis (3%).

Author(s): 
Chastan, Nathalie
Parain, Dominique
Publication Title: 
Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior

INTRODUCTION: According to the cold control theory of hypnosis (Dienes and Perner, 2007), hypnotic response occurs because of inaccurate higher order thoughts of intending. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is a region likely involved in constructing accurate higher order thoughts. Thus, disrupting DLPFC with low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) should make it harder to be aware of intending to perform an action. That is, it should be easier to respond to a hypnotic suggestion.

Author(s): 
Dienes, Zoltan
Hutton, Sam
Publication Title: 
Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology

OBJECTIVE: To (1) evaluate the effects of a single session of four non-pharmacological pain interventions, relative to a sham tDCS procedure, on pain and electroencephalogram- (EEG-) assessed brain oscillations, and (2) determine the extent to which procedure-related changes in pain intensity are associated with changes in brain oscillations.

Author(s): 
Jensen, Mark P.
Sherlin, Leslie H.
Askew, Robert L.
Fregni, Felipe
Witkop, Gregory
Gianas, Ann
Howe, Jon D.
Hakimian, Shahin
Publication Title: 
Neuroscience Research

Hypnosis often leads people to obey a suggestion of movement and to lose perceived voluntariness. This inexplicable phenomenon suggests that the state of the motor system may be altered by hypnosis; however, objective evidence for this is still lacking. Thus, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation of the primary motor cortex (M1) to investigate how hypnosis, and a concurrent suggestion that increased motivation for a force exertion task, influenced the state of the motor system.

Author(s): 
Takarada, Yudai
Nozaki, Daichi
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is frequent in persons living with spinal cord injury (SCI). Conventionally, the pain is treated pharmacologically, yet long-term pain medication is often refractory and associated with side effects. Non-pharmacological interventions are frequently advocated, although the benefit and harm profiles of these treatments are not well established, in part because of methodological weaknesses of available studies.

Author(s): 
Boldt, Inga
Eriks-Hoogland, Inge
Brinkhof, Martin W. G.
de Bie, Rob
Joggi, Daniel
von Elm, Erik

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