Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation

Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration-deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries.

Author(s): 
Binder, Allan I.
Publication Title: 
Clinics in Perinatology

A supportive medical team should be well informed on the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities of coping with or mitigating labor pain to appropriately support and respectfully care for parturients. Using the methodical rigor of previously published Cochrane systematic reviews, this summary evaluates and discusses the efficacy of nonpharmacologic labor analgesic interventions.

Author(s): 
Arendt, Katherine W.
Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer A.
Publication Title: 
Clinics in Perinatology

A supportive medical team should be well informed on the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities of coping with or mitigating labor pain to appropriately support and respectfully care for parturients. Using the methodical rigor of previously published Cochrane systematic reviews, this summary evaluates and discusses the efficacy of nonpharmacologic labor analgesic interventions.

Author(s): 
Arendt, Katherine W.
Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer A.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is frequent in persons living with spinal cord injury (SCI). Conventionally, the pain is treated pharmacologically, yet long-term pain medication is often refractory and associated with side effects. Non-pharmacological interventions are frequently advocated, although the benefit and harm profiles of these treatments are not well established, in part because of methodological weaknesses of available studies.

Author(s): 
Boldt, Inga
Eriks-Hoogland, Inge
Brinkhof, Martin W. G.
de Bie, Rob
Joggi, Daniel
von Elm, Erik
Publication Title: 
Anesthesia and Analgesia

We assessed the efficacy of nonpharmacologic techniques to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) by systematic review. These studies included acupuncture, electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, acupoint stimulation, and acupressure. Of the 24 randomized trials retrieved by a search of articles indexed on the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1980-1997), 19 were eligible for meta-analysis. The primary outcomes were the incidence of nausea, vomiting, or both 0-6 h (early efficacy) or 0-48 h (late efficacy) after surgery.

Author(s): 
Lee, A.
Done, M. L.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), originally based on the gate-control theory of pain, is widely used for the treatment of chronic low back pain. Despite its wide use and theoretical rationale, there appears at first glance little scientific evidence to support its use. This Cochrane review examines the available evidence on TENS for the treatment of chronic back pain through an exhaustive search of the literature.

Author(s): 
Gadsby, J. G.
Flowerdew, M. W.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease that affects synovial joints, which mainly causes degeneration and destruction of hyaline cartilage. To date, no curative treatment for OA exists. The primary goals for OA therapy are to relieve pain, maintain or improve functional status, and minimize deformity. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a noninvasive modality in physiotherapy that is commonly used to control both acute and chronic pain arising from several conditions. A number of trials evaluating the efficacy of TENS in OA have been published.

Author(s): 
Osiri, M.
Welch, V.
Brosseau, L.
Shea, B.
McGowan, J.
Tugwell, P.
Wells, G.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) affects a large proportion of the population. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was introduced more than 30 years ago as an alternative therapy to pharmacological treatments for chronic pain. However, despite its widespread use, the effectiveness of TENS is still controversial. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of TENS in the treatment of chronic LBP. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to June 1, 2000.

Author(s): 
Milne, S.
Welch, V.
Brosseau, L.
Saginur, M.
Shea, B.
Tugwell, P.
Wells, G.
Publication Title: 
The Clinical Journal of Pain

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review was to determine how effective acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, acupuncture-like transcutaneous nerve stimulation, laser therapy, electrical nerve stimulation, and neuroreflexotherapy are in the management of chronic pain. METHODOLOGY: The literature search identified six systematic reviews of the literature and four randomized controlled trials to provide evidence for this review. RESULTS: The systematic reviews included different methodologies and heterogeneity of study groups, but studies were generally of poor methodology.

Author(s): 
Fargas-Babjak, A.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Dysmenorrhoea is the occurrence of painful menstrual cramps of the uterus. Medical therapy for dysmenorrhoea commonly consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or the oral contraceptive pill both of which work by reducing myometrial (uterine muscle) activity. However, these treatments are accompanied by a number of side effects, making an effective non-pharmacological method of treating dysmenorrhoea of potential value. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment that has been shown to be effective for pain relief in a variety of conditions.

Author(s): 
Proctor, M. L.
Smith, C. A.
Farquhar, C. M.
Stones, R. W.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation