Trauma

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that affects many who have experienced trauma. In addition to skills-focused treatments, exposure-based treatments, cognitive therapy, combination treatments, and EMDR, a number of alternative treatments for PTSD have emerged in recent years. The search for alternative treatments is justified based on the empirical observation that a large percentage of individuals fail to benefit optimally from existing treatments (e.g., between 30 and 60).

Author(s): 
Sciarrino, Nicole A.
DeLucia, Christian
O'Brien, Kaitlin
McAdams, Kristen
Publication Title: 
Trauma, Violence & Abuse

Health and human service providers have expressed growing interest in the benefits of yoga to help individuals cope with the effects of trauma, including anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite the growing popularity and strong appeal of yoga, providers must be mindful of the evidence regarding the efficacy of yoga in treating trauma effects as well as trauma-related mental health symptoms and illnesses.

Author(s): 
Macy, Rebecca J.
Jones, Elizabeth
Graham, Laurie M.
Roach, Leslie
Publication Title: 
Trauma, Violence & Abuse

Health and human service providers have expressed growing interest in the benefits of yoga to help individuals cope with the effects of trauma, including anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite the growing popularity and strong appeal of yoga, providers must be mindful of the evidence regarding the efficacy of yoga in treating trauma effects as well as trauma-related mental health symptoms and illnesses.

Author(s): 
Macy, Rebecca J.
Jones, Elizabeth
Graham, Laurie M.
Roach, Leslie
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric Research

The interaction of genetic and environmental factors may affect the course and development of psychotic disorders. We examined whether the effects of childhood trauma on cognition and symptoms in schizophrenia were moderated by the Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val(158)Met polymorphism, a common genetic variant known to affect cognition and prefrontal dopamine levels. Participants were 429 schizophrenia/schizoaffective cases from the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank (ASRB).

Author(s): 
Green, Melissa J.
Chia, T.-Yunn
Cairns, Murray J.
Wu, Jingqin
Tooney, Paul A.
Scott, Rodney J.
Carr, Vaughan J.
Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank
Publication Title: 
Neuropharmacology

Epigenetic modifications in response to traumatic experience and stress are emerging as important factors in the long-term biological trajectories leading to stress-related psychiatric disorders, reflecting both environmental influences as well as individual genetic predisposition. In particular, recent evidence on DNA methylation changes within distinct genes and pathways but also on a genome-wide level provides new insights into the pathophysiology of stress related psychiatric disorders.

Author(s): 
Klengel, Torsten
Pape, Julius
Binder, Elisabeth B.
Mehta, Divya
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

Intergenerational effects of trauma have been observed clinically in a wide range of populations, and parental PTSD has been associated with an increased risk for psychopathology in offspring. In studies of Holocaust survivor offspring, parental PTSD, and particularly maternal PTSD, has been associated with increased risk for PTSD, low basal urinary cortisol excretion and enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone.

Author(s): 
Lehrner, Amy
Bierer, Linda M.
Passarelli, Vincent
Pratchett, Laura C.
Flory, Janine D.
Bader, Heather N.
Harris, Iris R.
Bedi, Aarti
Daskalakis, Nikolaos P.
Makotkine, Iouri
Yehuda, Rachel
Publication Title: 
Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science

Reported exposure to traumatic event is relatively common within the general population (40-90%), but only a fraction of individuals will develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Indeed, the lifetime prevalence of PTSD is estimated to range between 7% and 12%. The factors influencing risk or resilience to PTSD after exposure to traumatic events are likely both environmental, such as type, timing, and extent of trauma, and genetic. Recently, epigenetic mechanisms have been implicated in mediating altered risk for PTSD as they can reflect both genetic and environmental influences.

Author(s): 
Rampp, Carina
Binder, Elisabeth B.
ProvenÁal, Nadine
Publication Title: 
Depression and Anxiety

BACKGROUND: DNA methylation of the SKA2 gene has recently been implicated as a biomarker of suicide risk and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To examine the specificity and reliability of these findings, we examined associations between SKA2 DNA methylation, broad dimensions of psychiatric symptoms, and suicide phenotypes in adults with high levels of trauma exposure. METHODS: A total of 466 White, non-Hispanic veterans and their intimate partners (65% male) underwent clinical assessment and had blood drawn for genotyping and methylation analysis.

Author(s): 
Sadeh, Naomi
Wolf, Erika J.
Logue, Mark W.
Hayes, Jasmeet P.
Stone, Annjanette
Griffin, L. Michelle
Schichman, Steven A.
Miller, Mark W.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the current prevalence, and demographic, military, health, and psychosocial correlates of loneliness in a contemporary nationally representative sample of older U.S. veterans. METHODS: Two thousand twenty-five veterans aged 60 years and older participated in the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study. Loneliness was assessed using a questionnaire adapted from the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale. A broad range of demographic, military, health, and psychosocial variables was also assessed.

Author(s): 
Kuwert, Philipp
Knaevelsrud, Christine
Pietrzak, Robert H.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Nursing Scholarship: An Official Publication of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing

PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine gender and race variations in regards to the influence of religious involvement (RI) as a moderator of the effects of early traumatic stress (ETS) on health-related quality of life among adult survivors of child abuse. DESIGN: A cross-sectional predictive design was used to study Seventh-day Adventist adults in North America (N = 10,283). METHODS: A secondary analysis of data collected via questionnaires was done using multiple regression.

Author(s): 
Reinert, Katia G.
Campbell, Jacquelyn C.
Bandeen-Roche, Karen
Sharps, Phyllis
Lee, Jerry

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