Tumor Suppressor Proteins

Publication Title: 
The EMBO journal

Telomere loss has been proposed as a mechanism for counting cell divisions during aging in normal somatic cells. How such a mitotic clock initiates the intracellular signalling events that culminate in G1 cell cycle arrest and senescence to restrict the lifespan of normal human cells is not known. We investigated the possibility that critically short telomere length activates a DNA damage response pathway involving p53 and p21(WAF1) in aging cells.

Author(s): 
Vaziri, H.
West, M. D.
Allsopp, R. C.
Davison, T. S.
Wu, Y. S.
Arrowsmith, C. H.
Poirier, G. G.
Benchimol, S.
Publication Title: 
The EMBO journal

The yeast Sir2 protein mediates chromatin silencing through an intrinsic NAD-dependent histone deacetylase activity. Sir2 is a conserved protein and was recently shown to regulate lifespan extension both in budding yeast and worms. Here, we show that SIRT1, the human Sir2 homolog, is recruited to the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies of mammalian cells upon overexpression of either PML or oncogenic Ras (Ha-rasV12). SIRT1 binds and deacetylates p53, a component of PML nuclear bodies, and it can repress p53-mediated transactivation.

Author(s): 
Langley, Emma
Pearson, Mark
Faretta, Mario
Bauer, Uta-Maria
Frye, Roy A.
Minucci, Saverio
Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe
Kouzarides, Tony
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

Cellular senescence limits the replicative capacity of normal cells and acts as an intrinsic barrier that protects against the development of cancer. Telomere shortening-induced replicative senescence is dependent on the ATM-p53-p21 pathway but additional genes likely contribute to senescence. Here, we show that the p53-responsive gene BTG2 plays an essential role in replicative senescence. Similar to p53 and p21 depletion, BTG2 depletion in human fibroblasts leads to an extension of cellular lifespan, and ectopic BTG2 induces senescence independently of p53.

Author(s): 
Wheaton, Keith
Muir, Jennifer
Ma, Weili
Benchimol, Samuel
Publication Title: 
Molecular Biology of the Cell

Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors control diverse cellular functions, such as cell death, metabolism, and longevity. We analyzed FOXO3/FKHRL1 expression and subcellular localization in tumor sections of neuroblastoma patients and observed a correlation between nuclear FOXO3 and high caspase-8 expression. In neuroblastoma caspase-8 is frequently silenced by DNA methylation. Conditional FOXO3 activated caspase-8 gene expression but did not change the DNA-methylation pattern of regulatory sequences in the caspase-8 gene.

Author(s): 
Geiger, Kathrin
Hagenbuchner, Judith
Rupp, Martina
Fiegl, Heidi
Sergi, Consolato
Meister, Bernhard
Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula
M¸ller, Thomas
Ausserlechner, Michael J.
Obexer, Petra
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cellular Biochemistry

Homo sapiens longevity assurance homologue 2 of yeast LAG1 (LASS2), also known as tumor metastasis suppressor gene 1 (TMSG1), is a newly found tumor metastasis suppressor gene in 1999. Preliminary studies showed that it not only suppressed tumor growth but also closely related to tumor metastasis, however, its molecular mechanisms is still unclear.

Author(s): 
Xu, Xiaoyan
You, Jiangfeng
Pei, Fei
Publication Title: 
Genes & Development

Alterations in the architecture and dynamics of the nuclear lamina have a causal role in normal and accelerated aging through both cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms. However, the precise nature of the molecular cues involved in this process remains incompletely defined. Here we report that the accumulation of prelamin A isoforms at the nuclear lamina triggers an ATM- and NEMO-dependent signaling pathway that leads to NF-?B activation and secretion of high levels of proinflammatory cytokines in two different mouse models of accelerated aging (Zmpste24(-/-) and Lmna(G609G/G609G) mice).

Author(s): 
Osorio, Fernando G.
B·rcena, Clea
Soria-Valles, Clara
Ramsay, Andrew J.
de Carlos, FÈlix
Cobo, Juan
Fueyo, Antonio
Freije, JosÈ M. P.
LÛpez-OtÌn, Carlos
Publication Title: 
Methods in Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.)

p53, a guardian of the genome, exerts its tumor suppression activity by regulating a large number of downstream targets involved in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Although p53-mediated apoptosis is able to kill cancer cells, a role for cellular senescence in p53-dependent tumor suppression is becoming clear. Mouse studies showed that activation of p53-induced premature senescence promotes tumor regression in vivo.

Author(s): 
Qian, Yingjuan
Chen, Xinbin
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

Accumulation of tau is a critical event in several neurodegenerative disorders, collectively known as tauopathies, which include Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. Pathological tau is hyperphosphorylated and aggregates to form neurofibrillary tangles. The molecular mechanisms leading to tau accumulation remain unclear and more needs to be done to elucidate them. Age is a major risk factor for all tauopathies, suggesting that molecular changes contributing to the aging process may facilitate tau accumulation and represent common mechanisms across different tauopathies.

Author(s): 
Caccamo, Antonella
MagrÏ, Andrea
Medina, David X.
Wisely, Elena V.
LÛpez-Aranda, Manuel F.
Silva, Alcino J.
Oddo, Salvatore
Publication Title: 
Genetics

Neurodegeneration is a hallmark of the human disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) that is caused by mutation of the A-T mutated (ATM) gene. We have analyzed Drosophila melanogaster ATM mutants to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in A-T. Previously, we found that ATM mutants upregulate the expression of innate immune response (IIR) genes and undergo neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Here, we present evidence that activation of the IIR is a cause of neurodegeneration in ATM mutants.

Author(s): 
Petersen, Andrew J.
Katzenberger, Rebeccah J.
Wassarman, David A.
Publication Title: 
Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids

GLUT-4 (glucose transporter) receptor, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukins-6 (IL-6), daf-genes and PPARs (peroxisomal proliferation activator receptors) play a role in the development of insulin resistance syndrome and associated conditions. But, the exact interaction between these molecules/factors and the mechanism(s) by which they produce insulin resistance syndrome is not clear.

Author(s): 
Das, Undurti N.

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