Urinary Tract Infections

Publication Title: 
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology

We introduce a mindful evidence-based practice model to operationalize mindfulness to improve bedside infection prevention practices. Using catheter-associated urinary tract infection prevention as an example, we illustrate how clinicians can be more mindful about appropriate catheter indications and timely catheter removal.

Author(s): 
Kiyoshi-Teo, Hiroko
Krein, Sarah L.
Saint, Sanjay
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological (antibiotics) or non-pharmacological (cranberry products, acupuncture, probiotics and behavioural modifications). So far little is known about the best way to prevent RUTI in pregnant women.

Author(s): 
Schneeberger, Caroline
Geerlings, Suzanne E.
Middleton, Philippa
Crowther, Caroline A.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Urology

PURPOSE: Increasing antimicrobial resistance has stimulated interest in nonantibiotic prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections. We assessed the effectiveness, tolerability and safety of nonantibiotic prophylaxis in adults with recurrent urinary tract infections. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MEDLINE®, EMBASE™, the Cochrane Library and reference lists of relevant reviews were searched to April 2013 for relevant English language citations. Two reviewers selected randomized controlled trials that met the predefined criteria for population, interventions and outcomes.

Author(s): 
Beerepoot, M. a. J.
Geerlings, S. E.
van Haarst, E. P.
van Charante, N. Mensing
ter Riet, G.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

BACKGROUND: Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem among women. However, comparative effectiveness strategies for managing recurrent UTIs are lacking. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature review of management of women experiencing ?3 UTIs per year. We then developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo model of recurrent UTI for each management strategy with ?2 adequate trials published. We simulated a cohort that experienced 3 UTIs/year and a secondary cohort that experienced 8 UTIs/year.

Author(s): 
Eells, Samantha J.
Bharadwa, Kiran
McKinnell, James A.
Miller, Loren G.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological (antibiotics) or non-pharmacological (cranberry products, acupuncture, probiotics and behavioural modifications). So far little is known about the best way to prevent RUTI in pregnant women.

Author(s): 
Schneeberger, Caroline
Geerlings, Suzanne E.
Middleton, Philippa
Crowther, Caroline A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Applied Microbiology

AIMS: In this study, an attempt has been made to isolate and identify the bioactive compounds from hydroalcoholic extract of Terminalia chebula fruits effective against multidrug-resistant uropathogens and also to elucidate the influence of metal ions on the growth inhibitory activity of isolated compounds against the studied bacteria, if any. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bioassay-guided fractionation and extensive spectrometric analyses (FT-IR, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR and ESI-MS) were used to isolate and characterize the bioactive compound.

Author(s): 
Bag, A.
Bhattacharyya, S. K.
Chattopadhyay, R. R.
Publication Title: 
Pharmaceutical Biology

CONTEXT: Bacterial ureases play an important role in pathogenesis of urinary infections. Selection of plants was done on the basis of their uses by the local people for the treatment of various bacterial and urinary infections. OBJECTIVE: Our investigation screens and evaluates 15 Indian medicinal plants for their possible urease inhibitory activity as well as their ability to inhibit bacteria causing urinary infections.

Author(s): 
Bai, Sheema
Bharti, Pooja
Seasotiya, Leena
Malik, Anupma
Dalal, Sunita
Publication Title: 
JAMA pediatrics

IMPORTANCE: A child's health, positive perceptions of the research team and consent process, and altruistic motives play significant roles in the decision-making process for parents who consent for their child to enroll in clinical research. This study identified that nonconsenting parents were better educated, had private insurance, showed lower levels of altruism, and less understanding of study design. OBJECTIVE: To determine the factors associated with parental consent for their child's participation in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

Author(s): 
Hoberman, Alejandro
Shaikh, Nader
Bhatnagar, Sonika
Haralam, Mary Ann
Kearney, Diana H.
Colborn, D. Kathleen
Kienholz, Michelle L.
Wang, Li
Bunker, Clareann H.
Keren, Ron
Carpenter, Myra A.
Greenfield, Saul P.
Pohl, Hans G.
Mathews, Ranjiv
Moxey-Mims, Marva
Chesney, Russell W.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Urology

Recently, a study was made of 8 boys with complications after corrective surgical procedures for dysfunction of the voiding mechanism. One of these patients already had been subjected to irreversible diversion before the basic disorder was recognized but the majority was treated with suggestion (often with hypnosis) as well as with drugs affecting the smooth muscle (1 adolescent was too hostile to accept treatment).

Author(s): 
Hinman, F.
Baumann, F. W.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) is a commonly performed radiologic procedure in children that can be both painful and frightening. Given the distress that some children experience during the VCUG and the need for children to be alert and cooperative during the procedure, finding a psychological intervention that helps children to manage anxiety, distress, and pain is clearly desirable. This study was designed to examine whether relaxation and analgesia facilitated with hypnosis could reduce distress and procedure time for children who undergo this procedure.

Author(s): 
Butler, Lisa D.
Symons, Barbara K.
Henderson, Shelly L.
Shortliffe, Linda D.
Spiegel, David

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