Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1

Publication Title: 
Aging

Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, at least in part by causing endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory activation. The class III histone deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated in extension of lifespan. In the vasculature,SIRT1 gain-of-function using SIRT1 overexpression or activation has been shown to improve endothelial function in mice and rats via stimulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). However, the effects of SIRT1 loss-of-function on the endothelium in atherosclerosis remain to be characterized.

Author(s): 
Stein, Sokrates
Sch‰fer, Nicola
Breitenstein, Alexander
Besler, Christian
Winnik, Stephan
Lohmann, Christine
Heinrich, Kathrin
Brokopp, Chad E.
Handschin, Christoph
Landmesser, Ulf
Tanner, Felix C.
L¸scher, Thomas F.
Matter, Christian M.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Artemether is the derivative extracted from Chinese traditional herb and originally used for malaria. Artemether also has potential therapeutic effects against tumors. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is an important cell surface adhesion molecule associated with malignancy of gliomas. In this work, we investigated the role and mechanism of artemether combined with shRNA interference of VCAM-1 (shRNA-VCAM-1) on the migration, invasion and apoptosis of glioma cells.

Author(s): 
Wang, Ying-Bin
Hu, Yi
Li, Zhen
Wang, Ping
Xue, Yi-Xue
Yao, Yi-Long
Yu, Bo
Liu, Yun-Hui
Publication Title: 
Circulation

BACKGROUND: Although diabetes confers an increased propensity toward accelerated atherogenesis, data are lacking on monocyte activity in type 2 diabetic patients with (DM2-MV) and without (DM2) macrovascular disease compared with control subjects.

Author(s): 
Devaraj, S.
Jialal, I.
Publication Title: 
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology

OBJECTIVE: In addition to being a cardiovascular risk marker, recent studies support a role for CRP in atherothrombosis. Several investigators have reported that CRP binds to Fcgamma receptors on leukocytes. The aim of the study is to determine the processing of CRP by human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). METHODS AND RESULTS: Binding studies were performed by incubation of HAECs with biotinylated CRP (B-CRP, 25 to 200 microg/mL) for 30 to 180 minutes at 4 degrees C. B-CRP binding was quantitated using streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate followed by flow cytometry.

Author(s): 
Devaraj, Sridevi
Du Clos, Terry W.
Jialal, Ishwarlal
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology

Monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion is a key early event in atherogenesis. C-reactive protein (CRP), a cardiovascular risk marker, is known to stimulate ICAM and VCAM in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) and induces monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which native CRP promotes monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion under static conditions and tested the effect of CRP on adhesion under shear flow.

Author(s): 
Devaraj, Sridevi
Davis, Benjamin
Simon, Scott I.
Jialal, Ishwarlal
Publication Title: 
Free Radical Biology & Medicine

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are thought to play a central role in the etiology of cell dysfunction and tissue damage in sepsis. However, there is limited and controversial evidence from in vivo studies that ROS mediate cell signaling processes that elicit acute inflammatory responses during sepsis. Because NADPH oxidase is one of the main cellular sources of ROS, we investigated the role of this enzyme in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute inflammation in vivo, utilizing mice deficient in the gp91(phox) or p47(phox) subunits of NADPH oxidase.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Wei-Jian
Wei, Hao
Frei, Balz
Publication Title: 
Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental

The objective of the study was to determine whether short-term antioxidant (AOX) supplementation affects insulin sensitivity, endothelial adhesion molecule levels, and oxidative stress in overweight young adults.

Author(s): 
Vincent, Heather K.
Bourguignon, Cheryl M.
Weltman, Arthur L.
Vincent, Kevin R.
Barrett, Eugene
Innes, Karen E.
Taylor, Ann G.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland)

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Abscisic acid (ABA) has shown effectiveness in ameliorating inflammation in obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease models. The objective of this study was to determine whether ABA prevents or ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: C57BL/6J mice were fed diets with or without ABA (100mg/kg) for 35 days prior to challenge with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). The severity of clinical disease was assessed daily.

Author(s): 
Guri, Amir J.
Hontecillas, Raquel
Bassaganya-Riera, Josep
Publication Title: 
Experimental Biology and Medicine (Maywood, N.J.)

Vascular inflammation and monocyte recruitment are initiating events in atherosclerosis that have been suggested to be caused, in part, by iron-mediated oxidative stress and shifts in the intracellular redox environment of vascular cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate whether the intracellular iron chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), reduces inflammation and atherosclerosis in experimental mice.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Wei-Jian
Wei, Hao
Frei, Balz
Publication Title: 
Endocrine, Metabolic & Immune Disorders Drug Targets

Vitamin E regulation of disease has been extensively studied in humans, animal models and cell systems. Most of these studies focus on the α-tocopherol isoform of vitamin E. These reports indicate contradictory outcomes for anti-inflammatory functions of the α-tocopherol isoform of vitamin E, especially with regards to clinical studies of asthma and atherosclerosis. These seemingly disparate clinical results are consistent with recently reported unrecognized properties of isoforms of vitamin E.

Author(s): 
Cook-Mills, Joan M.
McCary, Christine A.

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