Vasomotor System

Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years.

Author(s): 
Hill, D. Ashley
Crider, Mark
Hill, Susan R.
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. METHODS: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees.

Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats are a common concern of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and are associated with a decreased quality of life. These symptoms can be effectively managed with hormone therapy, but safety concerns limit its use. Thus, understanding the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic therapies such as acupuncture or yoga is critical to managing these common symptoms in older women.

Author(s): 
Goldstein, Karen M.
McDuffie, Jennifer R.
Shepherd-Banigan, Megan
Befus, Deanna
Coeytaux, Remy R.
Van Noord, Megan G.
Goode, Adam P.
Masilamani, Varsha
Adam, Soheir
Nagi, Avishek
Williams, John W.
Publication Title: 
Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVE: To describe the effects of six interventions for menopausal vasomotor symptoms relative to control in a pooled analysis, facilitating translation of the results for clinicians and symptomatic women. The Menopause Strategies: Finding Lasting Answers for Symptoms and Health network tested these interventions in three randomized clinical trials. METHODS: An analysis of pooled individual-level data from three randomized clinical trials is presented. Participants were 899 perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with at least 14 bothersome vasomotor symptoms per week.

Author(s): 
Guthrie, Katherine A.
LaCroix, Andrea Z.
Ensrud, Kristine E.
Joffe, Hadine
Newton, Katherine M.
Reed, Susan D.
Caan, Bette
Carpenter, Janet S.
Cohen, Lee S.
Freeman, Ellen W.
Larson, Joseph C.
Manson, JoAnn E.
Rexrode, Kathy
Skaar, Todd C.
Sternfeld, Barbara
Anderson, Garnet L.
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. METHODS: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees.

Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats are a common concern of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and are associated with a decreased quality of life. These symptoms can be effectively managed with hormone therapy, but safety concerns limit its use. Thus, understanding the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic therapies such as acupuncture or yoga is critical to managing these common symptoms in older women.

Author(s): 
Goldstein, Karen M.
McDuffie, Jennifer R.
Shepherd-Banigan, Megan
Befus, Deanna
Coeytaux, Remy R.
Van Noord, Megan G.
Goode, Adam P.
Masilamani, Varsha
Adam, Soheir
Nagi, Avishek
Williams, John W.
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years.

Author(s): 
Hill, D. Ashley
Crider, Mark
Hill, Susan R.
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. METHODS: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees.

Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats are a common concern of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and are associated with a decreased quality of life. These symptoms can be effectively managed with hormone therapy, but safety concerns limit its use. Thus, understanding the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic therapies such as acupuncture or yoga is critical to managing these common symptoms in older women.

Author(s): 
Goldstein, Karen M.
McDuffie, Jennifer R.
Shepherd-Banigan, Megan
Befus, Deanna
Coeytaux, Remy R.
Van Noord, Megan G.
Goode, Adam P.
Masilamani, Varsha
Adam, Soheir
Nagi, Avishek
Williams, John W.
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years.

Author(s): 
Hill, D. Ashley
Crider, Mark
Hill, Susan R.

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