Vestibular Diseases

Publication Title: 
BMC neurology

BACKGROUND: Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a well-accepted exercise program intended to remedy balance impairment caused by damage to the peripheral vestibular system. Alternative therapies, such as Tai Chi (TC), have recently gained popularity as a treatment for balance impairment. Although VR and TC can benefit people with vestibulopathy, the degree to which gait improvements may be related to neuromuscular adaptations of the lower extremities for the two different therapies are unknown.

Author(s): 
McGibbon, Chris A.
Krebs, David E.
Parker, Stephen W.
Scarborough, Donna M.
Wayne, Peter M.
Wolf, Steven L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development

The optimal strategies for improving locomotor stability in people with vestibulopathy remain unclear. To help identify likely targets for intervention, we sought to determine whether vestibulopathic postural control impairment during locomotor activity was more localized to either the head or the whole body. We used high curvature analysis (HCA) to quantify the smoothness of head- and body-velocity trajectories during repeated stepping in 18 vestibulopathic and 17 healthy subjects.

Author(s): 
Cavanaugh, James T.
Goldvasser, Dov
McGibbon, Chris A.
Krebs, David E.
Publication Title: 
HNO

A functional cervical spine disorder is often the cause for persistent vertigo, which can last months or several years. The existence of cervical vertigo is not generally recognized, mainly because an objectivation of the cervical nystagmus is not easily understood by many examiners. In this study we examine additional parameters, which underline the diagnosis of cervical imbalance. The anamnestic statement of staggering refers to a disturbance of the vestibulospinal reactions.

Author(s): 
Hülse, M.
Hölzl, M.
Publication Title: 
HNO

A functional cervical spine disorder is often the cause for persistent vertigo, which can last months or several years. The existence of cervical vertigo is not generally recognized, mainly because an objectivation of the cervical nystagmus is not easily understood by many examiners. In this study we examine additional parameters, which underline the diagnosis of cervical imbalance. The anamnestic statement of staggering refers to a disturbance of the vestibulospinal reactions.

Author(s): 
Hülse, M.
Hölzl, M.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the rationale and scientific support for Tai Chi as an intervention for vestibulopathy and to offer recommendations for future studies. DATA SOURCES: A computer-aided search, including MEDLINE and Science Citation Index, to identify original Tai Chi studies published in English; relevant references cited in the retrieved articles were also included.

Author(s): 
Wayne, Peter M.
Krebs, David E.
Wolf, Steven L.
Gill-Body, Kathleen M.
Scarborough, Donna M.
McGibbon, Chris A.
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Parker, Stephen W.
Publication Title: 
BMC neurology

BACKGROUND: Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a well-accepted exercise program intended to remedy balance impairment caused by damage to the peripheral vestibular system. Alternative therapies, such as Tai Chi (TC), have recently gained popularity as a treatment for balance impairment. Although VR and TC can benefit people with vestibulopathy, the degree to which gait improvements may be related to neuromuscular adaptations of the lower extremities for the two different therapies are unknown.

Author(s): 
McGibbon, Chris A.
Krebs, David E.
Parker, Stephen W.
Scarborough, Donna M.
Wayne, Peter M.
Wolf, Steven L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium & Orientation

Tai Chi (TC) is a comparatively new intervention for peripheral vestibular hypofunction, which is often treated with vestibular rehabilitation (VR). We compared gaze stability (GZS), whole-body stability (WBS) and footfall stability (FFS) during locomotion among 26 people with vestibulopathy (VSP), randomized into two treatment arms (13 TC and 13 VR). Each intervention program was offered for 10 weeks. GZS improved more for VR than for TC, but WBS (and FFS) improved more for TC than for VR.

Author(s): 
McGibbon, Chris A.
Krebs, David E.
Wolf, Steven L.
Wayne, Peter M.
Scarborough, Donna Moxley
Parker, Stephen W.
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses the demographics of dizziness in the older person, the evaluation of the older dizzy patient and how the treatment of dizziness in older patients differs from that in younger individuals. RECENT FINDINGS: Seven percent of all visits to primary care physicians for patients older than 65 years of age are for dizziness, and dizziness is the most common complaint for patients older than 75 years. In a German study, the 12-month prevalence of vertigo in the general population was 5% with an incidence of 1.4% in adults overall.

Author(s): 
Furman, Joseph M.
Raz, Yael
Whitney, Susan L.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the rationale and scientific support for Tai Chi as an intervention for vestibulopathy and to offer recommendations for future studies. DATA SOURCES: A computer-aided search, including MEDLINE and Science Citation Index, to identify original Tai Chi studies published in English; relevant references cited in the retrieved articles were also included.

Author(s): 
Wayne, Peter M.
Krebs, David E.
Wolf, Steven L.
Gill-Body, Kathleen M.
Scarborough, Donna M.
McGibbon, Chris A.
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Parker, Stephen W.
Publication Title: 
BMC neurology

BACKGROUND: Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a well-accepted exercise program intended to remedy balance impairment caused by damage to the peripheral vestibular system. Alternative therapies, such as Tai Chi (TC), have recently gained popularity as a treatment for balance impairment. Although VR and TC can benefit people with vestibulopathy, the degree to which gait improvements may be related to neuromuscular adaptations of the lower extremities for the two different therapies are unknown.

Author(s): 
McGibbon, Chris A.
Krebs, David E.
Parker, Stephen W.
Scarborough, Donna M.
Wayne, Peter M.
Wolf, Steven L.

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