Veterinary Medicine

Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Record

Eighteen Norwegian dairy farmers were interviewed to examine their reasons for using homoeopathic treatments in managing their herds' health. Overall, they chose the treatments on the basis of factors related to their personal experience, considerations of individual animals and the framework for dairy production. For individual animals homoeopathy was used as an alternative to conventional veterinary treatment, but at the herd level it was used to complement it.

Author(s): 
Hektoen, L.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present report is to provide an overview of the first database on clinical research in veterinary homeopathy. PROCEDURES: Detailed searches in the database 'Veterinary Clinical Research-Database in Homeopathy' (http://www.carstens-stiftung.de/clinresvet/index.php). RESULTS: The database contains about 200 entries of randomised clinical trials, non-randomised clinical trials, observational studies, drug provings, case reports and case series.

Author(s): 
Clausen, Jürgen
Albrecht, Henning
Publication Title: 
Veterinary Dermatology

The efficacy of pharmacological interventions used to treat canine atopic dermatitis, excluding fatty acid supplementation and allergen-specific immunotherapy, was evaluated based on the systematic review of prospective clinical trials published between 1980 and 2002.

Author(s): 
Olivry, T.
Mueller, R. S.
International Task Force on Canine Atopic Dermatitis
Publication Title: 
Berliner Und Munchener Tierarztliche Wochenschrift

Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) like acupuncture, herbal medicine and homeopathy is increasingly used in the treatment of human and animal disease. On the other hand, CAM is discussed controversially, especially in the context of Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine (EBVM). This paper provides a balanced analysis of the currently available data on CAM in human and veterinary medicine. In conclusion, little rigorous research data concerning the efficacy and safety of CAM has been published.

Author(s): 
Arlt, Sebastian
Heuwieser, Wolfgang
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Record

Homeopathy has become the focus of increasing interest and use as a complementary and alternative treatment for both human and animal disease. However, from the point of view of academic medicine, this type of therapy is controversial. The use of highly diluted remedies cannot be reconciled with the scientific theories on which the current understanding of disease and its treatment is based, and clinical research in the field is considered to be neither extensive enough nor of a high enough standard to determine whether homeopathic treatments are clinically effective.

Author(s): 
Hektoen, L.
Publication Title: 
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica. Supplementum

Alternative therapy of animals is described, in the meaning of alternatives to veterinary therapy traditionally accepted by veterinary faculties and schools and included in their curricula. Alternative therapy composes of different disciplines, of which homeopathy is emphasised in this presentation. Information is given on the use and interest of such therapy among veterinarians and animal owners. Homeopathy as other alternative therapies, may offer great advances, if they induce any effect. Some of the disciplines are based on a scientifically accepted documentation.

Author(s): 
Løken, T.
Publication Title: 
Berliner Und Munchener Tierarztliche Wochenschrift

This review gives a summary of the definitions, delimitations and principles of homeopathy and its potential mechanisms of action, which is followed by an overview and critical evaluation of the most important homeopathic drugs registered for treatment of animals. It is shown that several of the marketed homeopathic drugs for treatment of animals violate current drug laws and represent a risk for both the animals and the consumer of food produced from animals.

Author(s): 
Löscher, W.
Richter, A.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

INTRODUCTION: Systematic review of the research evidence in veterinary homeopathy has never previously been carried out. This paper presents the search methods, together with categorised lists of retrieved records, that enable us to identify the literature that is acceptable for future systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in veterinary homeopathy. METHODS: All randomised and controlled trials of homeopathic intervention (prophylaxis and/or treatment of disease, in any species except man) were appraised according to pre-specified criteria.

Author(s): 
Mathie, Robert T.
Hacke, Daniela
Clausen, Jürgen
Publication Title: 
BMC veterinary research

BACKGROUND: No systematic review has previously been carried out on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of veterinary homeopathy in which the control group was an intervention other than placebo (OTP). For eligible peer-reviewed RCTs, the objectives of this study were to assess the risk of bias (RoB) and to quantify the effect size of homeopathic intervention compared with an active comparator or with no treatment. METHODS: Our systematic review approach complied fully with the PRISMA 2009 Checklist.

Author(s): 
Mathie, Robert T.
Clausen, Jürgen
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Targeted research development in veterinary homeopathy is properly informed by the systematic collection and analysis of relevant clinical data obtained by its practitioners. We organised a pilot data collection study, in which 8 Faculty of Homeopathy veterinarians collected practice-based clinical and outcomes data over a 6-month period.

Author(s): 
Mathie, R. T.
Hansen, L.
Elliott, M. F.
Hoare, J.

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