Victoria

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Introducing holism and complementary medicine into mainstream medical education provides many scientific, philosophical, and personal challenges. The growth of new knowledge always necessitates venturing into areas, which are, by definition, unknown, hence arise potential clashes of ideology, knowledge, evidence, interpretation, language, and personality. This paper outlines some of the experience and progress made at Monash University Victoria, Australia, in teaching this material in undergraduate medical education.

Author(s): 
Hassed, Craig S.
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

The health (self-reported health conditions) and nutritional status (food and nutrient intake, nutritional biochemistry, anthropometry) of 189 elderly Greeks living in Melbourne, Australia were described and compared with 104 elderly Greeks living in a rural town in Greece (Spata) using a validated health and food frequency questionnaire. Spata was chosen because the traditional diet is maintained by the community and may act as a 'surrogate' measure of diets prevalent in Greece prior to the Melbourne sample's migration to Australia in the 1960s.

Author(s): 
Kouris-Blazos, A.
Wahlqvist, M. L.
Trichopoulou, A.
Polychronopoulos, E.
Trichopoulos, D.
Publication Title: 
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes

BACKGROUND: Nutrition and physical activity are major determinants of health and quality of life; however, there exists little research focusing on determinants of these behaviours in older adults. This is important, since just as these behaviours vary according to subpopulation, it is likely that the determinants also vary.

Author(s): 
McNaughton, Sarah A.
Crawford, David
Ball, Kylie
Salmon, Jo
Publication Title: 
Monash Bioethics Review

After twelve years as the inaugural Director of the Caroline Chisholm Centre for Health Ethics, leading Melbourne bioethicist Dr Norman M Ford has resigned his position. Instead of contemplating retirement however, the tireless septuagenarian, who is also a philosopher, author, Honorary Research Fellow in the School of Philosophy and Bioethics at Monash University and Catholic Salesian priest, has his sights set on tackling even more controversial biomedical issues as an independent research scholar and author. Georgina Hall gets an insight into his life's work.

Author(s): 
Hall, Georgina
Publication Title: 
Journal of Religion and Health

Theistic and spiritually based beliefs and behaviors have been demonstrated to consistently predict physical and mental health, although the psychological processes underlying these relationships are unclear. This study investigated associative relationships and pathways of mediation between religious functioning, locus of control (LOC) and health. The sample consisted of 122 Christians (79 women, 43 men) who were predominately Catholic, ranging in age from 18 to 80 (M = 45.47, SD = 15.0).

Author(s): 
Ryan, Matthew E.
Francis, Andrew J. P.
Publication Title: 
Australasian Journal on Ageing

AIM: To investigate the influence of perceived stress, optimism and perceived control of internal states on the psychological adjustment of older adults. METHOD: The sample consisted of 212 older adults, aged between 58 and 103 (M?=?80.42 years, SD?=?7.31 years), living primarily in retirement villages in Melbourne, Victoria. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale, Life Orientation Test-Revised, Perceived Control of Internal States Scale and the World Health Organisation Quality of Life-Bref.

Author(s): 
Bretherton, Susan Jane
McLean, Louise Anne
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

The present study examined individual differences in change in extraversion, neuroticism, and work and relationship satisfaction. Of particular interest were the correlations between changes. Data were from the Victorian Quality of Life Panel Study (B. Headey & A. Wearing, 1989, 1992), in which an overall 1,130 individuals participated (ages 16 to 70). Respondents were assessed every 2 years from 1981 to 1989. Four major findings emerged. (a) There were significant individual differences in changes in extraversion and neuroticism. (b) Change was not limited to young adulthood.

Author(s): 
Scollon, Christie Napa
Diener, Ed
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing

BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE: Women's perceptions of childbirth are defined within sociocultural context. Listening to the voices of women is essential to increase nurses' sensitivity to the needs of childbearing women and help nurses provide culturally competent healthcare. PURPOSE: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify Australian women's perceptions of giving birth. METHOD: Seventeen Australian women who had given birth in the past 12 months participated in audiotaped interviews. Trustworthiness of the findings was ensured.

Author(s): 
Callister, Lynn Clark
Holt, Shelley Thacker
Kuhre, Melody West
Publication Title: 
BMC public health

BACKGROUND: In pregnancy, untreated chlamydia infection has been associated with adverse outcomes for both mother and infant. Like most women, pregnant women infected with chlamydia do not report genital symptoms, and are therefore unlikely to be aware of their infection. The aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of screening pregnant women aged 16-25 years for chlamydia as part of routine antenatal care.

Author(s): 
Bilardi, Jade E.
De Guingand, Deborah L.
Temple-Smith, Meredith J.
Garland, Suzanne
Fairley, Christopher K.
Grover, Sonia
Wallace, Euan
Hocking, Jane S.
Tabrizi, Sepehr
Pirotta, Marie
Chen, Marcus Y.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Economics

In this paper we argue that the usual framework for evaluating health services may need modification in the context of a National Health Scheme (NHS). Some costs and benefits may need to be ignored or discounted, others included at face value, and some transfer payments included in the decision algorithm. In contrast with the standard framework, we argue that economic evaluation in the context of an NHS should focus on 'social transfers' between taxpayers and beneficiaries, and that the nature and scope of these transfers is determined by the level of social generosity.

Author(s): 
Richardson, Jeff
McKie, John

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