Video Recording

Publication Title: 
BMC pregnancy and childbirth

BACKGROUND: A longitudinal repeated measures design over pregnancy and post-birth, with a control group would provide insight into the mechanical adaptations of the body under conditions of changing load during a common female human lifespan condition, while minimizing the influences of inter human differences.

Author(s): 
Gilleard, Wendy L.
Publication Title: 
JAMA oncology

IMPORTANCE: Information regarding treatment options and prognosis is essential for patient decision making. Patient perception of physicians as being less compassionate when they deliver bad news might be a contributor to physicians' reluctance in delivering these types of communication.

Author(s): 
Tanco, Kimberson
Rhondali, Wadih
Perez-Cruz, Pedro
Tanzi, Silvia
Chisholm, Gary B.
Baile, Walter
Frisbee-Hume, Susan
Williams, Janet
Masino, Charles
Cantu, Hilda
Sisson, Amy
Arthur, Joseph
Bruera, Eduardo
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

BACKGROUND: Previous research explored students' reasoning in the face of professional dilemmas, using interviews in response to videotaped scenarios. This study determined the effects of a change in context (to a written exam) and format (video versus text scenarios) on students' response patterns. METHOD: Fifty-three students were randomized to videotaped or text-based scenarios in the context of a mock written exam. Responses were coded by two raters. RESULTS: Interrater reliability was high (kappa = 0.872).

Author(s): 
Ginsburg, Shiphra R.
Regehr, Glenn
Mylopoulos, Maria
Publication Title: 
Transplantation Proceedings

BACKGROUND: Information about brain stem death and donation can be influence the consent rate for donation and its psychosocial effects. The aim of this study was to create a "VIDEO" model that could be used to help physicians to develop communication skills. METHODS: A video recorded 32 simulations of family interviews: 16 under-age and 16 adult donors. They were analyzed during 8 courses conducted in 2008 and 2009. During the VIDEO process, the visual presentation was followed by participants (n=192) discussing interactively the donation situation.

Author(s): 
Smudla, A.
Mih·ly, S.
Heged¸s, K.
Nemes, B.
Fazakas, J.
Publication Title: 
Epilepsia

PURPOSE: To determine the validity of the Hypnotic Induction Profile (HIP) followed by seizure induction during continuous video-electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring to discriminate between epileptic (EE) and nonepileptic events (NEE). METHODS: Eighty-two patients admitted to the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center for differential diagnosis of seizure-like events were evaluated. Exclusion criteria included inability or refusal to complete the HIP, lack of a "typical" event, an IQ <70, present evidence of psychosis, or a physiological cause for NEE.

Author(s): 
Barry, J. J.
Atzman, O.
Morrell, M. J.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Only a few studies have been reported in which suggestion was used to provoke pseudoseizures (PS). In these studies PS were video EEG monitored, and saline injections were administered as placebo. This method may be somewhat unethical and carries a low success rate. The authors, two child psychiatrists (GZ and DS) and a neurologist (NG), applied hypnosis to provoke PS which were monitored by video-EEG. Pre-, intra- and post-ictal serum prolactin levels were determined.

Author(s): 
Zalsman, Gil
Dror, Shachar
Gadoth, Natan
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Dental Association (1939)

BACKGROUND: The authors conducted two pilot studies that investigated the roles of hypnotizability, absorption (defined as the ability to maintain focused attention on a task or stimulus) and state versus trait anxiety as predictors of dental anxiety. One of the studies also examined the effectiveness of hypnosis in managing dental anxiety. METHODS: Participants in study 1 completed measures of hypnotizability and anxiety, viewed a video of a dental procedure either under hypnosis or not, and completed dental anxiety questionnaires.

Author(s): 
DiClementi, Jeannie D.
Deffenbaugh, Jennifer
Jackson, Daniel
Publication Title: 
Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B

OBJECTIVE: An estimated 24% of patients referred to epilepsy clinics actually have nonepileptic seizures. Various procedures have been used to precipitate nonepileptic events. The goal of this study was to use hypnosis in seizure provocation and differentiation between epileptic and nonepileptic seizure events. METHODS: Fifty study participants were enrolled from the Via Christi Comprehensive Epilepsy Center's video/electroencephalography unit. Patients underwent the Hypnotic Induction Profile (HIP) to assess susceptibility to hypnosis.

Author(s): 
Khan, Ahsan Y.
Baade, Lyle
Ablah, Elizabeth
McNerney, Victor
Golewale, Mazhar H.
Liow, Kore
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether placebo responses can be explained by characteristics of the patient, the practitioner, or their interpersonal interaction. METHODS: We performed an analysis of videotape and psychometric data from a clinical trial of patients with irritable bowel syndrome who were treated with placebo acupuncture in either a warm empathic interaction (Augmented, n = 96), a neutral interaction (Limited, n = 97), or a waitlist control (Waitlist, n = 96).

Author(s): 
Kelley, John M.
Lembo, Anthony J.
Ablon, J. Stuart
Villanueva, Joel J.
Conboy, Lisa A.
Levy, Ray
Marci, Carl D.
Kerr, Catherine E.
Kirsch, Irving
Jacobson, Eric E.
Riess, Helen
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Publication Title: 
Infant Behavior & Development

Depressed and non-depressed mothers and their 3-month-old infants were videotaped during breastfeeding and bottlefeeding interactions. The videotapes were subsequently coded for a number of feeding interaction behaviors as well as being rated on the Interaction Rating Scales. No differences were noted between the depressed and non-depressed mothers. Several breastfeeding versus bottlefeeding group effects were observed. The breastfeeding mothers showed less burping and less intrusive behavior during the nipple-in periods as well as during the nipple-out periods.

Author(s): 
Field, Tiffany
Diego, Miguel
Hernandez-Reif, Maria
Figueiredo, Barbara
Ezell, Shauna
Siblalingappa, Vijaya

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