Williams, W. M.

Publication Title: 
Why aren't more women in science?: Top researchers debate the evidence

After providing an outline of the contents of this book, the chapter considers recent history relevant to the debate on women in science. It discusses the evidence-based grounds for a biologically based argument in a number of the essays in this volume. The chapter describes the need for this volume. The essays in this volume show that the pattern of sex differences is much more nuanced than their depiction in the popular media (e.g., male=right brain; female=left brain).

Author(s): 
Williams, Wendy M.
Ceci, Stephen J.
Publication Title: 
Why aren't more women in science?: Top researchers debate the evidence

Society is becoming increasingly scientific, technological, and knowledge-based, depending on the utilization and maximization of human talent and potential (Friedman, 2005). A nation's strength, both economically and civically, is now linked to what it can call forth from the minds of its citizens. Consequently, much attention is being focused on strategies for increasing the number of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals produced in the United States and possible untapped pools of talent.

Author(s): 
Lubinski, David S.
Benbow, Camilla Persson
Publication Title: 
Why aren't more women in science?: Top researchers debate the evidence

There are interesting differences between the average male and female mind. In using the word average, I am from the outset recognizing that such differences may have little to say about individuals. In addition, the differences are subtle and are to do with the relative proportions of different drives in the typical male and female mind. The field of sex differences in psychology in the 1960s and 1970s was so conflict-ridden as to make an open-minded debate about any potential role of biology contributing to psychological sex differences impossible.

Author(s): 
Baron-Cohen, Simon
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