Workplace

Publication Title: 
Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England)

BACKGROUND: Mental health is an important issue in the working population. Interventions to improve mental health have included physical activity. AIMS: To review evidence for the effectiveness of workplace physical activity interventions on mental health outcomes. METHODS: A literature search was conducted for studies published between 1990 and August 2013. Inclusion criteria were physical activity trials, working populations and mental health outcomes. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad scale.

Author(s): 
Chu, A. H. Y.
Koh, D.
Moy, F. M.
Müller-Riemenschneider, F.
Publication Title: 
American journal of health promotion: AJHP

PURPOSE: To review critically the research literature on the health effects of worksite stress-management interventions. SEARCH METHODS: Stress-management interventions were defined as techniques that are designed to help employees modify their appraisal of stressful situations or deal more effectively with the symptoms of stress. Stress-management studies that were worksite based, assessed a health outcome, and were published in the peer-reviewed literature were included in this review.

Author(s): 
Murphy, L. R.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic exposure to stress has been linked to several negative physiological and psychological health outcomes. Among employees, stress and its associated effects can also result in productivity losses and higher healthcare costs. In-person (face-to-face) and computer-based (web- and mobile-based) stress management interventions have been shown to be effective in reducing stress in employees compared to no intervention. However, it is unclear if one form of intervention delivery is more effective than the other.

Author(s): 
Kuster, Anootnara Talkul
Dalsbø, Therese K.
Luong Thanh, Bao Yen
Agarwal, Arnav
Durand-Moreau, Quentin V.
Kirkehei, Ingvild
Publication Title: 
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health

Objectives The aim of the systematic review was to provide an overview of the evidence on the effectiveness of brief interventions targeting mental health and well-being in organizational settings and compare their effects with corresponding interventions of common (ie, longer) duration. Methods An extensive systematic search was conducted using the Medline and PsycINFO databases for the period of 2000-2016. Randomized-controlled trials (RCT) and quasi-experimental studies evaluating primary or secondary brief interventions carried out in the workplace settings were included.

Author(s): 
Ivandic, Ivana
Freeman, Aislinne
Birner, Ulrich
Nowak, Dennis
Sabariego, Carla
Publication Title: 
Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England)

BACKGROUND: A variety of workplace-based interventions exist to reduce stress and increase productivity. However, the efficacy of these interventions is sometimes unclear. AIMS: To determine whether complementary therapies offered in the workplace improve employee well-being. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature review which involved an electronic search of articles published between January 2000 and July 2015 from the databases Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE and PubMed.

Author(s): 
Ravalier, J. M.
Wegrzynek, P.
Lawton, S.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Office work has changed considerably over the previous couple of decades and has become sedentary in nature. Physical inactivity at workplaces and particularly increased sitting has been linked to increase in cardiovascular disease, obesity and overall mortality. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of workplace interventions to reduce sitting at work compared to no intervention or alternative interventions.

Author(s): 
Shrestha, Nipun
Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina T.
Verbeek, Jos H.
Ijaz, Sharea
Hermans, Veerle
Bhaumik, Soumyadeep
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: The number of people working whilst seated at a desk keeps increasing worldwide. As sitting increases, occupational physical strain declines at the same time. This has contributed to increases in cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes. Therefore, reducing and breaking up the time that people spend sitting while at work is important for health. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of workplace interventions to reduce sitting at work compared to no intervention or alternative interventions.

Author(s): 
Shrestha, Nipun
Ijaz, Sharea
Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina T.
Kumar, Suresh
Nwankwo, Chukwudi P.
Publication Title: 
Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache

Aim The purpose of this systematic literature review is to assess the benefits of workplace-based occupational therapies and interventions, including acute and preventive medication, on headache intensity and frequency, related disability as well as work-related outcomes. Methods A search of the literature was conducted in PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane library, CINAHL and Embase using terms related to headache, workplace and occupational health.

Author(s): 
Lardon, Arnaud
Girard, Marie-Pier
Zaïm, Chérine
Lemeunier, Nadège
Descarreaux, Martin
Marchand, Andrée-Anne
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

"Spirituality in the workplace" has become something of a fad in corporate America as companies seek to find a balance between their employees' personal beliefs and the bottom line. Does this newfound spirituality-meets-margin differ from the spirituality traditionally observed in faith-based organizations? Often secular organizations, in an attempt to be as non-offensive and inclusive as possible, adopt an all-or-nothing approach to workplace spirituality.

Author(s): 
Marceau, Paul D.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Ascension Health has asked all of its health care ministries to promote spirituality in the workplace. St. Mary's Health System, Evansville, IN, responded to this request with several initiatives, including the development, facilitation, and implementation of a new model for what St. Mary's calls its "Employee Renewal Day." Revamped from a voluntary unpaid day to a paid day on which participation is strongly encouraged, Employee Renewal Day 2004 focused on fellowship, relaxation, and the history and heritage of St. Mary's and its sponsor.

Author(s): 
Sister Betty Anne Darch, null
Newsmaster, Pamela

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