Yohimbine

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Obesity (2005)

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until January 2004. Hand-searches of relevant medical journals and bibliographies of identified articles were conducted.

Author(s): 
Pittler, M. H.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Obesity (2005)

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until January 2004. Hand-searches of relevant medical journals and bibliographies of identified articles were conducted.

Author(s): 
Pittler, M. H.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Pharmacology and Chemotherapy

Seven structurally-related compounds consisting of three antidepressant drugs (imipramine, desmethylimipramine and amitriptyline), three tranquillizing agents (promazine, chlorpromazine and chlorprothixene) and a hybrid, desmethylpromazine, have been examined in a series of tests involving autonomic functions and antagonism of reserpine.

Author(s): 
Halliwell, G.
Quinton, R. M.
Williams, F. E.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Obesity (2005)

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until January 2004. Hand-searches of relevant medical journals and bibliographies of identified articles were conducted.

Author(s): 
Pittler, M. H.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Pain

Joint manipulation has long been used for pain relief. However, the underlying mechanisms for manipulation-related pain relief remain largely unexplored. The purpose of the current study was to determine which spinal neurotransmitter receptors mediate manipulation-induced antihyperalgesia. Rats were injected with capsaicin (50 microl, 0.2%) into one ankle joint and mechanical withdrawal threshold measured before and after injection. The mechanical withdrawal threshold decreases 2 h after capsaicin injection.

Author(s): 
Skyba, D. A.
Radhakrishnan, R.
Rohlwing, J. J.
Wright, A.
Sluka, K. A.
Publication Title: 
NeuroImage

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Alterations in noradrenergic (NE) signaling have been implicated in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and adrenergic receptors are potential treatment targets. METHODS: To characterize central NE signaling in IBS, 11 patients and 11 healthy controls (HCs) were studied 3 times during an auditory oddball vigilance task after double-blind ingestion of the α2-adrenoreceptor (α2AR) antagonist yohimbine (YOH), the α2AR agonist clonidine (CLO), or placebo (PLA).

Author(s): 
Berman, Steven
Suyenobu, Brandall
Naliboff, Bruce D.
Bueller, Joshua
Stains, Jean
Wong, Heng
Mandelkern, Mark
Fitzgerald, Leah
Ohning, Gordon
Gupta, Arpana
Labus, Jennifer S.
Tillisch, Kirsten
Mayer, Emeran A.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Obesity (2005)

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until January 2004. Hand-searches of relevant medical journals and bibliographies of identified articles were conducted.

Author(s): 
Pittler, M. H.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Lipids in Health and Disease

BACKGROUND: We have recently reported that the dietary supplement Meltdown increases plasma norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EPI), glycerol, free fatty acids (FFA), and metabolic rate in men. However, in that investigation measurements ceased at 90 minutes post ingestion, with values for blood borne variables peaking at this time. It was the purpose of the present investigation to extend the time course of measurement to 6 hours, and to include women within the design to determine if sex differences to treatment exist.

Author(s): 
Bloomer, Richard J.
Canale, Robert E.
Blankenship, Megan M.
Hammond, Kelley G.
Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.
Schilling, Brian K.
Publication Title: 
Lipids in Health and Disease

BACKGROUND: Higenamine, also known as norcoclaurine, is an herbal constituent thought to act as a beta-2 adrenergic receptor agonist-possibly stimulating lipolysis. It was the purpose of this study to determine the impact of a higenamine-based dietary supplement on plasma free fatty acids and energy expenditure following acute oral ingestion.

Author(s): 
Lee, Sang-Rok
Schriefer, Johnhenry M.
Gunnels, Trint A.
Harvey, Innocence C.
Bloomer, Richard J.
Publication Title: 
Zhongguo Yao Li Xue Bao = Acta Pharmacologica Sinica

Xylazole (Xyl) is an analogue of xylazine (Xyn) synthesized by Lanzhou Institute of Chinese Traditional Veterinary Medicine. The effects of Xyl on heart rate and blood pressure were studied in 5 conscious dogs. Xyl 1 mg/kg iv was similar to Xyn in producing bradycardia and an initial transient hypertension followed by a lasting hypotension which was less significant than Xyn. Yohimbine (0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg), an alpha 2-adrenoreceptor blocking agent, antagonized bradycardia and hypotension induced by Xyl.

Author(s): 
Rong, Y. F.
Hsu, W. H.
Hembrough, F. B.
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