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Publication Title: 
Journal of Women & Aging

There has been a striking increase in Americans' awareness and use of alternative therapies over the last decade. Women, in particular, have been drawn to explore these unconventional health practices, which include herbal medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy, manual therapies, energy healing, and mind-body therapies.

Author(s): 
Gaylord, S.
Publication Title: 
Dreaming

Shamanism is a worldwide social phenomenon consisting of a set of practices (e.g., ritualistic drumming, sensory deprivation, the ingestion of entheogens and dream incubation) designed to obtain knowledge from alternative realities for the purpose of benefiting one’s social group. The aim of this paper is to provide a cross-cultural exploration of dreaming in the context of shamanism.

Author(s): 
Laughlin, Charles D.
Rock, Adam J.
Publication Title: 
History of Psychology

There is a need to make the teaching of the history and systems of psychology course more relevant for students in professional training programs. Most typical courses and textbooks are oriented around the history of the science of psychology, giving scant and generally passing attention to the development of the profession of psychology. The author draws on his experience teaching a history and systems course in PsyD programs and provides a structure for enhancing the relevancy of such courses in professional training programs. Two frameworks are used.

Author(s): 
Larson, Paul C.
Publication Title: 
A psychology of music: The influence of music on behavior

We have suggested in the preceding chapter that the great musicians of prehistoric times were regarded as magicians or sorcerers, capable of effecting astounding changes in man and nature. To the average sophisticated modern this may sound like nonsense. He may smile at the naivete of the myth-makers or subject the myths to psychoanalytic interpretation and find a wish, perhaps an expression of collective desire, and a symbolic structure. And with this analysis he will be satisfied, and he may conclude that there is nothing more to know.

Author(s): 
Diserens, Charles M.
Fine, Harry