Adaptation, Psychological

Publication Title: 
Psycho-Oncology

OBJECTIVE: To conduct an evidence-based review of yoga as an intervention for patients with cancer. Specifically, this paper reviewed the impact of yoga on psychological adjustment among cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted between May 2007 and April 2008. Data from each identified study were extracted by two independent raters; studies were included if they assessed psychological functioning and focused on yoga as a main intervention.

Author(s): 
Smith, Kelly B.
Pukall, Caroline F.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

Mind-body therapies are popular and are ranked among the top 10 complementary and integrative medicine practices reportedly used by adults and children in the 2007-2012 National Health Interview Survey. A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of mind-body therapies in pediatrics. This clinical report outlines popular mind-body therapies for children and youth and examines the best-available evidence for a variety of mind-body therapies and practices, including biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, guided imagery, meditation, and yoga.

Author(s): 
SECTION ON INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE
Publication Title: 
Current Oncology Reports

Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes.

Author(s): 
Chaoul, Alejandro
Milbury, Kathrin
Sood, Anil K.
Prinsloo, Sarah
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Research on the efficacy of yoga for improving mental, emotional, physical, and behavioral health characteristics in school settings is a recent but growing field of inquiry. This systematic review of research on school-based yoga interventions published in peer-reviewed journals offers a bibliometric analysis that identified 47 publications. The studies from these publications have been conducted primarily in the United States (n = 30) and India (n = 15) since 2005, with the majority of studies (n = 41) conducted from 2010 onward.

Author(s): 
Khalsa, Sat Bir S.
Butzer, Bethany
Publication Title: 
Geriatric Nursing (New York, N.Y.)

Recently, increased attention has been given to meditation-relaxation strategies to improve physical health, reduce pain, enhance immune response, improve emotional well-being, and foster spiritual growth. This article reviews research conducted in the last 25 years about meditation and spirituality, in particular as it relates to the health of the elderly. This review supports the hypothesis that meditation can be taught to the elderly, even those with dementia.

Author(s): 
Lindberg, Deborah A.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: There is a pressing need for improved end-of-life care. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may improve the quality of care but few controlled trials have evaluated CAM at the end of life. OBJECTIVES: To determine the strength of evidence for the benefits of touch and mind-body therapies in seriously ill patients. METHODS: Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of massage and mind-body therapies. A PubMed search of English language articles was used to identify the relevant studies.

Author(s): 
Lafferty, William E.
Downey, Lois
McCarty, Rachelle L.
Standish, Leanna J.
Patrick, Donald L.
Publication Title: 
Western Journal of Nursing Research

Initiation and maintenance of physical activity (PA) in older adults is of increasing concern as the benefits of PA have been shown to improve physical functioning, mood, weight, and cardiovascular risk factors. Meditative movement forms of PA, such as tai chi and qigong (TC & QG), are holistic in nature and have increased in popularity over the past few decades. Several randomized controlled trials have evaluated TC & QG interventions from multiple perspectives, specifically targeting older adults.

Author(s): 
Rogers, Carol E.
Larkey, Linda K.
Keller, Colleen
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: There is a pressing need for improved end-of-life care. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may improve the quality of care but few controlled trials have evaluated CAM at the end of life. OBJECTIVES: To determine the strength of evidence for the benefits of touch and mind-body therapies in seriously ill patients. METHODS: Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of massage and mind-body therapies. A PubMed search of English language articles was used to identify the relevant studies.

Author(s): 
Lafferty, William E.
Downey, Lois
McCarty, Rachelle L.
Standish, Leanna J.
Patrick, Donald L.
Publication Title: 
Current Oncology Reports

Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes.

Author(s): 
Chaoul, Alejandro
Milbury, Kathrin
Sood, Anil K.
Prinsloo, Sarah
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

Mind-body therapies are popular and are ranked among the top 10 complementary and integrative medicine practices reportedly used by adults and children in the 2007-2012 National Health Interview Survey. A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of mind-body therapies in pediatrics. This clinical report outlines popular mind-body therapies for children and youth and examines the best-available evidence for a variety of mind-body therapies and practices, including biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, guided imagery, meditation, and yoga.

Author(s): 
SECTION ON INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE

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