African Americans

Publication Title: 
Ethnicity & Disease

Public health literature indicates that psychosocial stress is an important contributor to chronic disease development. However, there is scant research on the health effects of stress for minority groups, who suffer from a high burden of chronic disease. This paper provides a review of studies that examine the relationship between psychosocial stress and chronic disease for 4th world indigenous groups and African Americans. A total of 50 associational and 15 intervention studies fit the inclusion criteria for this review.

Author(s): 
Paradies, Yin
Publication Title: 
Journal of Vascular Nursing: Official Publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

The purpose of this integrative review is to describe and assess randomized controlled trials of interventions to reduce peripheral arterial disease (PAD) risk factors among African Americans, given the high morbidity and mortality associated with PAD and the poorer outcomes in African Americans with PAD. The reviewed studies include non-pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure and lipids in African-American patients with the causal PAD risk factors of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia.

Author(s): 
Eastridge, Diana K.
Publication Title: 
Ethnicity & Disease

Public health literature indicates that psychosocial stress is an important contributor to chronic disease development. However, there is scant research on the health effects of stress for minority groups, who suffer from a high burden of chronic disease. This paper provides a review of studies that examine the relationship between psychosocial stress and chronic disease for 4th world indigenous groups and African Americans. A total of 50 associational and 15 intervention studies fit the inclusion criteria for this review.

Author(s): 
Paradies, Yin
Publication Title: 
South African Medical Journal = Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Geneeskunde

Compared with our ancestor's diet, that consumed by present-day Western populations is higher in intake of energy, of protein (especially animal protein) and of fat (especially animal fat), but lower in intake of fibre-containing cereal foods; this diet is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality from degenerative diseases.

Author(s): 
Walker, A. R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Dietetic Association

This article reviews the primary health problems of African-American, Hispanic-American, Asian/Pacific Islander-American, and Native-American elders. The goal is to familiarize practicing dietitians with the differences in longevity, disease spectrum, and functional status (where data are available) for each of these ethnic groups. These data should be of assistance in making decisions regarding dietary counseling for ethnic elders. It is acknowledged that most data accumulated according to race do not accurately measure ethnicity.

Author(s): 
Bernard, M. A.
Lampley-Dallas, V.
Smith, L.
Publication Title: 
The ABNF journal: official journal of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty in Higher Education, Inc

Obesity presents a public health challenge and is a serious chronic medical condition that is associated with multiple co-morbidities and reduced survivability/longevity. African American adolescents who retain weight after pregnancy are at the highest risk of becoming obese adults. Obesity is associated with 300,000 deaths per year and expected to cost the US. health care system over 237 million dollars within the next decade. The prevalence of obesity is cause for concern because of its economic costs and its toll in human suffering due to related morbidity and mortality.

Author(s): 
Phillips, Thelma
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

BACKGROUND: There are racial health disparities in many conditions for which oxidative stress is hypothesized to be a precursor. These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and premature aging. Small clinical studies suggest that psychological stress may increase oxidative stress. However, confirmation of this association in epidemiological studies has been limited by homogenous populations and unmeasured potential confounders.

Author(s): 
Szanton, Sarah L.
Rifkind, Joseph M.
Mohanty, Joy G.
Miller, Edgar R.
Thorpe, Roland J.
Nagababu, Eneka
Epel, Elissa S.
Zonderman, Alan B.
Evans, Michele K.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) - a marker of cell aging that has been linked to stressful life circumstances - in a nationally representative, socioeconomically and ethnically diverse sample of US adults aged 20-84. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002, we found that respondents who completed less than a high school education had significantly shorter telomeres than those who graduated from college. Income was not associated with LTL.

Author(s): 
Needham, Belinda L.
Adler, Nancy
Gregorich, Steven
Rehkopf, David
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Epel, Elissa S.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Theory suggests that chronic stress associated with disadvantaged social status may lead to acceleration in the rate of decline in physiological functioning. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between parental socioeconomic status (SES) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL), a marker of cell aging, in children. We examined SES and LTL in 70 white and black US children aged 7-13 who participated in the community-based AMERICO (Admixture Mapping for Ethnic and Racial Insulin Complex Outcomes) study. LTL was assessed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

Author(s): 
Needham, Belinda L.
Fernandez, Jose R.
Lin, Jue
Epel, Elissa S.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
Cancer causes & control: CCC

OBJECTIVE: Early menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. We investigated the variation in age at menarche by socioeconomic status (SES) and race. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted on 1,091 black and 986 white girls from the three sites in the United States as part of the NHLBI Growth and Health Study (NGHS), who were aged 9-10 years at baseline and followed through adolescence over a 10-year period with annual exams.

Author(s): 
Braithwaite, Dejana
Moore, Dan H.
Lustig, Robert H.
Epel, Elissa S.
Ong, Ken K.
Rehkopf, David H.
Wang, May C.
Miller, Suzanne M.
Hiatt, Robert A.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - African Americans