Altered State

Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Lankton, Stephen
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Frischholz, Edward J.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

In response to the recent special issue of the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis (Vol. 54, No. 4, "Cognitive Hypnotherapy: Twenty Years Later"), this commentary discusses: (1) the weak connection between cognitive science and cognitive behavioral therapy, and (2) the importance of coherent and testable theoretical underpinnings to the practice of psychotherapy. The author briefly introduces Relational Frame Theory (RFT), which postulates that strategies to control, manage, or extinguish language based internal experience are unlikely to be successful.

Author(s): 
Matthews, William J.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Meta-analyses consistently reveal that most of the response to antidepressant treatment can be obtained by placebo, and the difference between response to the drug and the response to any treatment is not clinically significant for most individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Furthermore, the best predictor of antidepressant efficacy is the response to placebo during the so-called placebo run-in period. It can also be shown that a significant portion of the placebo effect is expectancy. These data thus indicate that suggestion is a central factor in treating depression.

Author(s): 
Kirsch, Irving
Low, Carol B.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Placebo effects are widely recognized as having a potent impact upon treatment outcomes in both medical and psychological interventions, including hypnosis. In research utilizing randomized clinical trials, there is usually an effort to minimize or control placebo effects. However, in clinical practice there may be significant benefits in enhancing placebo effects. Prior research from the field of social psychology has identified three factors that may enhance placebo effects, namely: priming, client perceptions, and the theory of planned behavior.

Author(s): 
Sliwinski, Jim
Elkins, Gary R.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

This article examines how beliefs can influence the definition, classification, understanding, and treatment of depression. It is organized in five parts: The first part critically reviews the definition of depression; the second part explores the medicalization of depression; the third part examines the role of the pharmaceutical industry in the promotion and marketing of antidepressant medications; the fourth part surveys the psychological therapies for depression and examines the role of expectancy in outcome; and the last part looks at the mechanisms involved in the placebo effect.

Author(s): 
Alladin, Assen
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

The core issue regarding antidepressants for many clinicians is whether they perform significantly better than placebos.

Author(s): 
Yapko, Michael D.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Awareness of depression among OB-GYN physicians has increased with the result that more than 13% of pregnant women in the United States receive prescriptions for antidepressant medications. But the safety and effectiveness of these compounds has been exaggerated while the effectiveness of psychotherapy has been overlooked and distorted and various medical guidelines for treatment of perinatal depression have been downplayed or ignored. This article addresses the common fears and misconceptions surrounding treatment of depression during pregnancy and after childbirth.

Author(s): 
Rosenquist, Sara E.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder associated with profoundly impaired quality of life and emotional distress. The management of refractory IBS symptoms remains challenging and non-pharmacological therapeutic approaches have been shown to be effective. We compared brief interventions with biofeedback and hypnotherapy in women referred by their GP with refractory IBS symptoms. Patients were randomised to one of two treatment groups, biofeedback or hypnotherapy, delivered as three one-hour sessions over 12 weeks.

Author(s): 
Dobbin, A.
Dobbin, J.
Ross, S. C.
Graham, C.
Ford, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a common presentation to general practice. OBJECTIVE: This article explores the role of the mind in the experience of pain and describes how mind-body techniques can be used in the management of chronic pain. DISCUSSION: The mind, emotions and attention play an important role in the experience of pain. In patients with chronic pain, stress, fear and depression can amplify the perception of pain. Mind-body approaches act to change a person's mental or emotional state or utilise physical movement to train attention or produce mental relaxation.

Author(s): 
Hassed, Craig

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