Attitude to Death

Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVES: To determine what evidence exists to support the practice of viewing the deceased fetus by women terminating pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases searched (1966-2007) were Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Dissertation Abstracts Index. STUDY SELECTION: Literature was reviewed that either directly or parenthetically dealt with the emotional effects on women of viewing the fetus post termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA EXTRACTION: No randomized or controlled trials were found.

Author(s): 
Sloan, Eileen P.
Kirsh, Sharon
Mowbray, Mary
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Palliative Nursing

Palliative medicine and complementary therapies (CTs) have developed within the NHS as parallel philosophies of care. As a result, the last decade has seen an increase in the integration and usage of CTs, as adjunct therapies to conventional medical treatment. Documented benefits of relaxation, decreased perception of pain, reduced anxiety and improved sense of wellbeing have been shown to enable an enhanced quality of life, where curative treatment is no longer an option. Reiki is a more recent addition to the range of CTs available to cancer patients.

Author(s): 
Burden, Barbara
Herron-Marx, Sandy
Clifford, Collette
Publication Title: 
Tijdschrift Voor Gerontologie En Geriatrie

The desire for the extension of life is not one out of many desire in life, but a form of the fundamental desire for life itself. This so called 'categorical desire' is a necessary condition for the many desires in life. The question why we desire for life (and for its extension), is the question for the meaning of life. The searching for a 'natural lifespan' is meaningless when it wants to find in nature a given norm for the duration of life. It can only have meaning when it tries to formulate the conditions for the experience of life as successful and meaningful.

Author(s): 
van Tongeren, P.
Publication Title: 
Health care analysis: HCA: journal of health philosophy and policy

Scientists, bioethicists, and policy makers are currently engaged in a contentious debate about the scientific prospects and morality of efforts to increase human longevity. Some demographers and geneticists suggest that there is little reason to think that it will be possible to significantly extend the human lifespan. Other biodemographers and geneticists argue that there might well be increases in both life expectancy and lifespan. Bioethicists and policy makers are currently addressing many of the ethical, social, and economic issues raised by life extension research.

Author(s): 
Turner, Leigh
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Some researchers in the field of ageing claim that significant extension of the human lifespan will be possible in the near future. While many of these researchers have assumed that the community will welcome this technology, there has been very little research on community attitudes to life extension. This paper presents the results of an in-depth qualitative study of community attitudes to life extension across age groups and religious boundaries.

Author(s): 
Underwood, Mair
Bartlett, Helen P.
Partridge, Brad
Lucke, Jayne
Hall, Wayne D.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Clinical Psychology

OBJECTIVES: The present study explored the association between beliefs about death, superstitious beliefs, and health anxiety. It was hypothesized that negative beliefs about death and superstitious beliefs would be positively correlated with health anxiety. Conversely, positive beliefs about death were hypothesized to be negatively correlated with health anxiety. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, correlational and multiple regression design was adopted.

Author(s): 
James, Abigail
Wells, Adrian
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care

A cross-sectional survey was administered to family members of patients who died at 1 of the 5 Catholic institutions comprising Mercy Health Partners, a health care system in Ohio, to determine their opinions about patient and family participation in decisions about end-of-life care. Among 165 respondents, 118 (86%) of 138 agreed that the family was encouraged to join in decisions and 133 (91%) of 146 that their family member's health care choices were followed.

Author(s): 
Bernal, Ellen W.
Marco, Catherine A.
Parkins, Sue
Buderer, Nancy
Thum, Sister Dorothy
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy

Chaplains serving in the health care context provide a ministry to dying patients of inestimable worth as they comfort patients in the last chapter of the journey by being present, listening, and caring. Chaplains also play another important role, helping patients clarify ways in which their beliefs and values might influence health care decisions. This paper reviewed the current trends of spiritual diversity alongside the aging of a large Baby Boomer cohort.

Author(s): 
Ai, Amy L.
McCormick, Thomas R.
Publication Title: 
Intensive Care Medicine

PURPOSE: This study explored differences in end-of-life (EOL) decisions and respect for patient autonomy of religious members versus those only affiliated to that particular religion (affiliated is a member without strong religious feelings). METHODS: In 2005 structured questionnaires regarding EOL decisions were distributed in six European countries to ICUs in 142 hospital ICUs. This sub-study of the original data analyzed answers from Protestants, Catholics and Jews. RESULTS: A total of 304 physicians, 386 nurses, 248 patients and 330 family members were included in the study.

Author(s): 
B¸low, Hans-Henrik
Sprung, Charles L.
Baras, Mario
Carmel, Sara
Svantesson, Mia
Benbenishty, Julie
Maia, Paulo A.
Beishuizen, Albertus
Cohen, Simon
Nalos, Daniel
Publication Title: 
Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin

From the perspective of the terror management health model (TMHM), expectancies as to whether a health behavior is likely to effectively protect one's health (i.e., response efficacy) and whether an individual is optimistic about the outcomes of his or her health risk assessment (i.e., health optimism) should have a more potent influence on health decisions when thoughts of death are conscious and the health risk domain is potentially fatal.

Author(s): 
Cooper, Douglas P.
Goldenberg, Jamie L.
Arndt, Jamie

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