Attitude to Health

Publication Title: 
Health care analysis: HCA: journal of health philosophy and policy

Scientists, bioethicists, and policy makers are currently engaged in a contentious debate about the scientific prospects and morality of efforts to increase human longevity. Some demographers and geneticists suggest that there is little reason to think that it will be possible to significantly extend the human lifespan. Other biodemographers and geneticists argue that there might well be increases in both life expectancy and lifespan. Bioethicists and policy makers are currently addressing many of the ethical, social, and economic issues raised by life extension research.

Author(s): 
Turner, Leigh
Publication Title: 
Rejuvenation Research

There are a number of ethical, social, and personal implications generated by the potential development and use of technologies that may extend human longevity by intervening in aging. Despite speculations about likely public attitudes toward life extension, to date there have been few attempts to empirically examine the public's perspective of these issues. Using open-ended survey questions via telephone interviews, this study explored the attitudes of 605 members of the Australian public toward the implications of life extension.

Author(s): 
Partridge, Brad
Lucke, Jayne
Bartlett, Helen
Hall, Wayne
Publication Title: 
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Author(s): 
Macdonald, I.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Aging & Human Development

The health, illness, and life styles of the oldest Palauans were investigated by interview and examination in their homes. Thirty-eight citizens ranged in age from 86 to 111. Ten were 100 years or older. They were in unusually good physical and mental health. The most common physical problem is arthritis. Life style is described in terms of diet, physical activity, smoking and drinking habits, use of medical services, and living conditions.

Author(s): 
Jensen, G. D.
Polloi, A. H.
Publication Title: 
Health Psychology: Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

Good health has become more than a means to personal goals such as greater attractiveness and increased longevity. It symbolizes self-control, hard work, ambition, and success in life. Inherent in this symbolism is the concept that the individual controls behavior, which in turn controls health. Although control over one's life plays an important role in both physical and mental health, the concept of personal control also infers responsibility.

Author(s): 
Brownell, K. D.
Publication Title: 
Health Education Quarterly

Since the release of the Surgeon General's report, Healthy People, the general public has been barraged with health information and advice by the popular media. Accordingly, this article introduces a method for examining the public's beliefs about the importance of behavioral risk factors associated with health and longevity. The factorial survey approach--a technique appropriate for studying normative beliefs--seems uniquely suited to measuring the degree of public consensus regarding complex social phenomena.

Author(s): 
Love, M. B.
Thurman, Q.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Royal Society of Health

Morbidity and longevity among the middle-aged and elderly are affected by a variety of factors including genetics, social class, diet, smoking practice, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Additionally, in some individuals and communities, the factors of attitude, regularity of life and religiosity appear important. In this contribution, some behavioural and metabolic ramifications of adverse attitude are discussed, and some examples are given of benefits conferred in populations, past and present, marked by regularity of life and religiosity.

Author(s): 
Walker, A. R.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Author(s): 
Dossey, Larry
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Author(s): 
Siegel, Bernie
Publication Title: 
Sexually Transmitted Infections

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the psychosocial impact of lipodystrophy on the lifestyles of HIV positive patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 HIV positive patients on HAART at an outpatient sexually transmitted infections (STI) and HIV clinic in central London. Qualitative data from interview transcripts were analysed using grounded theory to elicit key categories and subcategories.

Author(s): 
Power, R.
Tate, H. L.
McGill, S. M.
Taylor, C.

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