Attitude of Health Personnel

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) by yoga therapists (YTs). OBJECTIVE: To determine the attitudes, skills, training, use, barriers and facilitators to the use of EBP amongst North American YTs DESIGN: Cross-sectional, descriptive survey METHODS: Self-identified YTs practicing in North America were invited to participate in an online survey. YT attitudes, skills, training, utilisation, barriers to use, and facilitators of EBP use were measured using the 84-item Evidence-Based practice Attitude and utilization SurvEy (EBASE).

Author(s): 
Sullivan, Marlysa
Leach, Matthew
Snow, James
Moonaz, Steffany
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of nurses toward the effectiveness and safety, as well as their recommendations for and personal use of complementary and alternative medical therapies. A, random sample of 1000 nurses throughout the United States were surveyed using a three-wave mailing. About half of the respondents perceived there was conclusive evidence or preponderance of evidence that five therapies were effective: biofeedback, chiropractic, meditation/relaxation, multi-vitamins, and massage therapy.

Author(s): 
Brolinson, P. G.
Price, J. H.
Ditmyer, M.
Reis, D.
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

BACKGROUND: Clinical trial evidence in controversial areas such as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) must be approached with an open mind. OBJECTIVE: To determine what factors may influence practitioners' interpretation of evidence from CAM trials. RESEARCH DESIGN: In a mailed survey of 2400 US CAM and conventional medicine practitioners we included 2 hypothetical factorial vignettes of positive and negative research results for CAM clinical trials. Vignettes contained randomly varied journal (Annals of Internal Medicine vs.

Author(s): 
Tilburt, Jon C.
Miller, Franklin G.
Jenkins, Sarah
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Clarridge, Brian
Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana
Emanuel, Ezekiel J.
Curlin, Farr A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of nurses toward the effectiveness and safety, as well as their recommendations for and personal use of complementary and alternative medical therapies. A, random sample of 1000 nurses throughout the United States were surveyed using a three-wave mailing. About half of the respondents perceived there was conclusive evidence or preponderance of evidence that five therapies were effective: biofeedback, chiropractic, meditation/relaxation, multi-vitamins, and massage therapy.

Author(s): 
Brolinson, P. G.
Price, J. H.
Ditmyer, M.
Reis, D.
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

BACKGROUND: Clinical trial evidence in controversial areas such as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) must be approached with an open mind. OBJECTIVE: To determine what factors may influence practitioners' interpretation of evidence from CAM trials. RESEARCH DESIGN: In a mailed survey of 2400 US CAM and conventional medicine practitioners we included 2 hypothetical factorial vignettes of positive and negative research results for CAM clinical trials. Vignettes contained randomly varied journal (Annals of Internal Medicine vs.

Author(s): 
Tilburt, Jon C.
Miller, Franklin G.
Jenkins, Sarah
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Clarridge, Brian
Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana
Emanuel, Ezekiel J.
Curlin, Farr A.
Publication Title: 
Behavior Modification

Despite the well-established effectiveness of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of anxiety disorders, therapists have been slow to adopt CBT into their clinical practice. The present study was conducted to examine the utilization of psychotherapy techniques for anxiety disorders among community practitioners in a rural setting in order to determine the current status of the dissemination of CBT. A sample of 51 licensed psychotherapists from various mental health professions was recruited from online practice listings in the state of Wyoming.

Author(s): 
Hipol, Leilani J.
Deacon, Brett J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIM: To review the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on Registered Nurses and nursing students. BACKGROUND: Work-related stress among nurses is estimated to be the biggest occupational health problem after musculoskeletal disorders. DESIGN: A mixed-method systematic review incorporating quantitative and qualitative data was conducted.

Author(s): 
Guillaumie, Laurence
Boiral, Olivier
Champagne, Julie
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Organization and Management

PURPOSE: The paper aims to take a reflective stance on the relationship between policy/evidence and practice, which, the authors argue, is conceptually under-developed. The paper aims to show that current research perspectives fail to frame evidence and policy in relation to practice. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A qualitative study was conducted in the English NHS in four Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). Seventy-five observations of meetings and 52 semi-structured interviews were completed.

Author(s): 
Gkeredakis, Emmanouil
Swan, Jacky
Powell, John
Nicolini, Davide
Scarbrough, Harry
Roginski, Claudia
Taylor-Phillips, Sian
Clarke, Aileen
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

Many children's nurses have significant contact with children who have breathing difficulties and should be using systematic criteria to assess their nursing needs. Children's nurses do not appear to follow systematic criteria but are strongly influenced by the medical model and this may be detrimental to holistic assessment and the development of nursing diagnoses based on nursing needs.

Author(s): 
Armitage, G.
Publication Title: 
AIDS education and prevention: official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education

Although the efficacy of small-group, risk reduction interventions based on cognitive behavioral principles has been widely documented in HIV behavioral research literature, little is known about how AIDS service organizations (ASOs) view these research-based models. From a nationwide sample of 77 ASOs, this study assessed factors influencing attitudes of prevention program directors and frontline staff toward research-based interventions.

Author(s): 
DiFranceisco, W.
Kelly, J. A.
Otto-Salaj, L.
McAuliffe, T. L.
Somlai, A. M.
Hackl, K.
Heckman, T. G.
Holtgrave, D. R.
Rompa, D. J.

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