Cardiovascular Diseases

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world, and its prevalence is rapidly increasing among developing nations. The increasing global prevalence of CVD reflects in part the concurrent rise in insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and other atherogenic changes associated with insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). Evidence suggests that chronic stress and related psychosocial factors also play an important role in the development and progression of IRS-related states and ultimately, in the pathogenesis of CVD.

Author(s): 
Innes, Kim E.
Vincent, Heather K.
Taylor, Ann Gill
Publication Title: 
Progress in Cardiovascular Nursing

Complementary therapies and healing practices have been found to reduce stress, anxiety, and lifestyle patterns known to contribute to cardiovascular disease. Promising therapies include imagery and hypnosis, meditation, yoga, tai chi, prayer, music, exercise, diet, and use of dietary supplements. Many of these complementary approaches to healing have been within the domain of nursing for centuries and can readily be integrated into the care of patients with cardiovascular disease.

Author(s): 
Kreitzer, Mary Jo
Snyder, Mariah
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Although emerging evidence during the past several decades suggests that psychosocial factors can directly influence both physiologic function and health outcomes, medicine had failed to move beyond the biomedical model, in part because of lack of exposure to the evidence base supporting the biopsychosocial model. The literature was reviewed to examine the efficacy of representative psychosocial-mind-body interventions, including relaxation, (cognitive) behavioral therapies, meditation, imagery, biofeedback, and hypnosis for several common clinical conditions.

Author(s): 
Astin, John A.
Shapiro, Shauna L.
Eisenberg, David M.
Forys, Kelly L.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: The aim of this article is to summarize and critically evaluate the evidence from systematic reviews (SRs) of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for lowering blood lipid levels (BLL). METHODS: Eight electronic databases were searched until March 2016. Additionally, all the retrieved references were inspected manually for further relevant papers. Systematic reviews were considered eligible, if they included patients of any age and/or gender with elevated blood lipid levels using any type of CAM.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, Paul
Albedah, Abdullah M. N.
Khalil, Mohamed M. K.
AlQaed, Meshari S.
Publication Title: 
Western Journal of Nursing Research

The benefits of physical activity are well established, yet few older adults engage in adequate physical activity to optimize health. While yoga may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, few studies have focused on the efficacy of yoga-based physical activity to promote cardiovascular health in older adults. The objective of this review is to provide an evaluation of yoga interventions to reduce cardiovascular risk in older adults. Four databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions in older adults. Studies with cardiovascular outcomes were included.

Author(s): 
Barrows, Jennifer L.
Fleury, Julie
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of published literature regarding the effects of yoga, a promising mind-body therapy, on specific anthropometric and physiologic indices of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and on related clinical endpoints. METHODS: We performed a literature search using 4 computerized English and Indian scientific databases. The search was restricted to original studies (1970 to 2004) evaluating the effects of yoga on CVD or indices of CVD risk associated with the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS).

Author(s): 
Innes, Kim E.
Bourguignon, Cheryl
Taylor, Ann Gill
Publication Title: 
Academic Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence for clinical applications of yoga among the pediatric population. METHODS: We conducted an electronic literature search including CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, Medline, PsycINFO, and manual search of retrieved articles from inception of each database until December 2008. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs) were selected that included yoga or yoga-based interventions for individuals aged 0 to 21 years.

Author(s): 
Birdee, Gurjeet S.
Yeh, Gloria Y.
Wayne, Peter M.
Phillips, Russell S.
Davis, Roger B.
Gardiner, Paula
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

BACKGROUND: Yoga, a popular mind-body practice, may produce changes in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndrome risk factors. DESIGN: This was a systematic review and random-effects meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were performed for systematic reviews and RCTs through December 2013. Studies were included if they were English, peer-reviewed, focused on asana-based yoga in adults, and reported relevant outcomes.

Author(s): 
Chu, Paula
Gotink, Rinske A.
Yeh, Gloria Y.
Goldie, Sue J.
Hunink, M. G. Myriam
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: A comprehensive bibliometric analysis was conducted on publications for yoga therapy research in clinical populations. METHODS: Major electronic databases were searched for articles in all languages published between 1967 and 2013. Databases included PubMed, PsychInfo, MEDLINE, IndMed, Indian Citation Index, Index Medicus for South-East Asia Region, Web of Knowledge, Embase, EBSCO, and Google Scholar. Nonindexed journals were searched manually. Key search words included yoga, yoga therapy, pranayama, asana. All studies met the definition of a clinical trial.

Author(s): 
Jeter, Pamela E.
Slutsky, Jeremiah
Singh, Nilkamal
Khalsa, Sat Bir S.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: A sedentary lifestyle and stress are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Since yoga involves exercise and is thought to help in stress reduction it may be an effective strategy in the primary prevention of CVD. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of any type of yoga on the primary prevention of CVD.

Author(s): 
Hartley, Louise
Dyakova, Mariana
Holmes, Jennifer
Clarke, Aileen
Lee, Myeong Soo
Ernst, Edzard
Rees, Karen

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