Cell Nucleus

Publication Title: 
Experimental Cell Research

Normal human diploid cells, TIG-1, ceased to proliferate at about the 62 population doubling level (PDL). Transformed clones isolated from TIG-1 cells infected with wtSV40 and those with tsA900 SV40 cultured at 34 degrees C were subcultured up to about 80 PDL. When the culture temperature of tsA SV40-transformed cells was shifted from 34 to 39.5 degrees C at 51 PDL, the growth curve of these transformed cells changed to that of normal young cells.

Author(s): 
Ide, T.
Tsuji, Y.
Nakashima, T.
Ishibashi, S.
Publication Title: 
Oncogene

A wide range of human diseases, including cancer, has a striking age-dependent onset. However, the molecular mechanisms that connect aging and cancer are just beginning to be unraveled. FOXO transcription factors are promising candidates to serve as molecular links between longevity and tumor suppression. These factors are major substrates of the protein kinase Akt. In the presence of insulin and growth factors, FOXO proteins are relocalized from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

Author(s): 
Greer, Eric L.
Brunet, Anne
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Hematology

FKHRL1 is one of the human homologues of DAF-16, which is concerned with longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Previously, we demonstrated that FKHRL1 functions downstream of Akt in erythropoietin (EPO) signaling and that it is directly phosphorylated by activated Akt. Because phosphorylated FKHRL1 loses its transcriptional activity and translocates into the cytoplasm, FKHRL1 appears to be nonfunctional in the presence of EPO.

Author(s): 
Uchida, Mie
Kirito, Keita
Endo, Hitoshi
Ozawa, Keiya
Komatsu, Norio
Publication Title: 
Oncogene

The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor (NRF2) is a key regulator of several enzymatic pathways, including cytoprotective enzymes in highly metabolic organs. In this review, we summarize the ongoing research related to NRF2 activity in cancer development, focusing on in vivo studies using NRF2 knockout (KO) mice, which have helped in defining the crucial role of NRF2 in chemoprevention. The lower cancer protection observed in NRF2 KO mice under calorie restriction (CR) suggests that most of the beneficial effects of CR on the carcinogenesis process are likely mediated by NRF2.

Author(s): 
MartÌn-Montalvo, A.
Villalba, J. M.
Navas, P.
de Cabo, R.
Publication Title: 
Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology

Sirtuins are protein deacetylases/mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases found in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. This group of enzymes relies on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) as a cofactor linking their activity to the cellular metabolic status. Originally found in yeast, Sir2 was discovered as a silencing factor and has been shown to mediate the effects of calorie restriction on lifespan extension.

Author(s): 
Toiber, Debra
Sebastian, Carlos
Mostoslavsky, Raul
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

The contribution that oxidative damage to DNA and/or RNA makes to the aging process remains undefined. In this study, we used the hMTH1-Tg mouse model to investigate how oxidative damage to nucleic acids affects aging. hMTH1-Tg mice express high levels of the hMTH1 hydrolase that degrades 8-oxodGTP and 8-oxoGTP and excludes 8-oxoguanine from both DNA and RNA. Compared to wild-type animals, hMTH1-overexpressing mice have significantly lower steady-state levels of 8-oxoguanine in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA of several organs, including the brain.

Author(s): 
De Luca, Gabriele
Ventura, Ilenia
Sanghez, Valentina
Russo, Maria Teresa
Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta
Cacci, Emanuele
Martire, Alberto
Popoli, Patrizia
Falcone, Germana
Michelini, Flavia
Crescenzi, Marco
Degan, Paolo
Minghetti, Luisa
Bignami, Margherita
Calamandrei, Gemma
Publication Title: 
Molecular Biology of the Cell

Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors control diverse cellular functions, such as cell death, metabolism, and longevity. We analyzed FOXO3/FKHRL1 expression and subcellular localization in tumor sections of neuroblastoma patients and observed a correlation between nuclear FOXO3 and high caspase-8 expression. In neuroblastoma caspase-8 is frequently silenced by DNA methylation. Conditional FOXO3 activated caspase-8 gene expression but did not change the DNA-methylation pattern of regulatory sequences in the caspase-8 gene.

Author(s): 
Geiger, Kathrin
Hagenbuchner, Judith
Rupp, Martina
Fiegl, Heidi
Sergi, Consolato
Meister, Bernhard
Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula
M¸ller, Thomas
Ausserlechner, Michael J.
Obexer, Petra
Publication Title: 
Molecular and Cellular Biology

SIRT3 is a member of the Sir2 family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases that promotes longevity in many organisms. The processed short form of SIRT3 is a well-established mitochondrial protein whose deacetylase activity regulates various metabolic processes. However, the presence of full-length (FL) SIRT3 in the nucleus and its functional importance remain controversial. Our previous studies demonstrated that nuclear FL SIRT3 functions as a histone deacetylase and is transcriptionally repressive when artificially recruited to a reporter gene.

Author(s): 
Iwahara, Toshinori
Bonasio, Roberto
Narendra, Varun
Reinberg, Danny
Publication Title: 
Molecular Cell

Forkhead box O (FOXO; DAF-16 in worms) transcription factors, which are of vital importance in cell-cycle control, stress resistance, tumor suppression, and organismal lifespan, are largely regulated through nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. Insulin signaling keeps FOXO/DAF-16 cytoplasmic, and hence transcriptionally inactive. Conversely, as in loss of insulin signaling, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can activate FOXO/DAF-16 through nuclear accumulation. How ROS regulate the nuclear translocation of FOXO/DAF-16 is largely unknown.

Author(s): 
Putker, Marrit
Madl, Tobias
Vos, Harmjan R.
de Ruiter, Hesther
Visscher, Marieke
van den Berg, Maaike C. W.
Kaplan, Mohammed
Korswagen, Hendrik C.
Boelens, Rolf
Vermeulen, Michiel
Burgering, Boudewijn M. T.
Dansen, Tobias B.
Publication Title: 
Biochemical Society Transactions

Although there is general agreement that most forms of common disease develop as a consequence of a combination of factors, including genetic, environmental and behavioural contributors, the actual mechanistic basis of how these factors initiate or promote diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases in some individuals but not in others with seemingly identical risk factor profiles, is not clearly understood.

Author(s): 
Ballinger, Scott W.

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