Cohort Studies

Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study on chiropractic patients with neck pain. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between self-reported benign adverse events after chiropractic care for neck pain and the outcome measures namely, perceived recovery, neck pain, and neck disability.

Author(s): 
Rubinstein, Sidney M.
Knol, Dirk L.
Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte
van Tulder, Maurits W.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to describe the profile of a cohort of patients who presented to a Neuro-Emotional Technique (NET) clinic. This study investigated the change in the Distress and Risk Assessment Method (DRAM) outcome measure score after a 3-month course of NET was administered to participants. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was an uncontrolled cohort study in private practice. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eighty-eight (188) consecutive new patients presented to a NET clinic.

Author(s): 
Bablis, Peter
Pollard, Henry
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society

In 2004, the American Pain Society (APS) issued evidence-based fibromyalgia treatment recommendations. The objective of this claims database analysis is to describe prescription and medical use in patients with newly diagnosed and established fibromyalgia. Privately insured patients with 2+ myalgia/myositis claims (1999 to 2005) were categorized as newly diagnosed or established; this dichotomy involves comparisons between prediagnosis (S1) and postdiagnosis (S2) stages in the newly diagnosed and between newly diagnosed (S2) and established patients (S3).

Author(s): 
White, Leigh Ann
Robinson, Rebecca L.
Yu, Andrew P.
Kaltenboeck, Anna
Samuels, Seth
Mallett, David
Birnbaum, Howard G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: Ultrasonography has been used to measure the cross-sectional area (CSA) of peripheral nerves, but the CSA of the brachial plexus has not previously been reported. The purpose of this study was to establish a reference range of values for the CSA of the brachial plexus, subclavian artery, and peak systolic velocity (PSV) of the subclavian artery in healthy subjects using ultrasonography. METHODS: Thirty-two asymptomatic subjects (19 men, 13 women) from a chiropractic college with an average age of 29.5 +/- 9.6 participated in the study.

Author(s): 
Haun, Daniel W.
Cho, John C. S.
Clark, Thomas B.
Kettner, Norman W.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical outcomes of patients with pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain (PRLP) treated according to a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort of consecutive patients with PRLP. Data on 115 patients were collected at baseline and on 78 patients at the end of the active treatment. Disability was measured using the Bournemouth Disability Questionnaire (BDQ). Pain intensity was measured using the Numerical Rating Scale for pain (NRS).

Author(s): 
Murphy, Donald R.
Hurwitz, Eric L.
McGovern, Ericka E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: This study presents the outcomes of patients with lumbar radiculopathy secondary to disk herniation treated after a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule. METHODS: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted at a multidisciplinary, integrated clinic that includes chiropractic and physical therapy health care services. Data on 49 consecutive patients were collected at baseline, at the end of conservative, nonsurgical treatment and a mean of 14.5 months after cessation of treatment.

Author(s): 
Murphy, Donald R.
Hurwitz, Eric L.
McGovern, Ericka E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: This is an observational prospective cohort study to explore the treatment effect of mechanical vs manual manipulation for acute low back pain. METHODS: Ninety-two patients with a history of acute low back pain were recruited from 3 private chiropractic offices, 2 of which used manual lumbar manipulation and 1 used mechanical instrument manipulation (Activator) as their primary modes of treatment. The chiropractors used their "treatment-as-usual" protocols for a maximum of 8 visits or 4 weeks, whichever occurred first.

Author(s): 
Schneider, Michael J.
Brach, Jennifer
Irrgang, James J.
Abbott, Katherine Verdolini
Wisniewski, Stephen R.
DeLitto, Anthony
Publication Title: 
Arthritis Care & Research

OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of sacroiliac (SI) joint abnormalities in a primary low back pain population remains unresolved. The aims of our study were to define the prevalence of SI joint disease in this cohort, and to identify clinical features that might accurately predict radiographic changes in the SI joint and spine. METHODS: Lumbar spine and anteroposterior pelvis radiographs taken over a 3-year period for the evaluation of back pain at a major chiropractic college were scored for the presence of inflammatory or degenerative features.

Author(s): 
O'Shea, F. D.
Boyle, E.
Salonen, D. C.
Ammendolia, C.
Peterson, C.
Hsu, W.
Inman, R. D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To compare occurrence of repeated disability episodes across types of health care providers who treat claimants with new episodes of work-related low back pain (LBP). METHOD: A total of 894 cases followed 1 year using workers' compensation claims data. Provider types were defined for the initial episode of disability and subsequent episode of health maintenance care.

Author(s): 
Cifuentes, Manuel
Willetts, Joanna
Wasiak, Radoslaw
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between a lifetime history of a work-related neck injury and the development of troublesome neck pain in the general population. METHODS: We formed a cohort of randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild neck pain in September 1995. At baseline, participants were asked if they had ever injured their neck at work. Six and 12 months later, participants were asked if they had troublesome neck pain defined as grades II to IV on the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Nolet, Paul S.
Côté, Pierre
Cassidy, J. David
Carroll, Linda J.

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