Complementary Therapies

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this investigation was to explore the effectiveness of search strategies developed to identify trials of specific complementary therapies in a range of clinical conditions. DESIGN: All primary studies included in a series of systematic reviews were identified. An analysis of the original source of the study and search term(s) by means of which the study had originally been retrieved was carried out. Each study was then searched for in each of 6 databases (AMED, Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO).

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for depression. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, the Cochrane Library and previous review papers. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirty-seven treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes. We give a description of each treatment, the rationale behind the treatment, a review of studies on effectiveness, and the level of evidence for the effectiveness studies.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Rodgers, Bryan
Publication Title: 
Maturitas

Large proportions of women have turned to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for relief from their menopausal symptoms. This highlights the need for more rigorous research into CAM. This article is aimed at critically reviewing surveys that examine the prevalence of CAM use by menopausal women worldwide. Eleven databases were searched for peer-reviewed surveys published in any language between 01 January 2000 and 27 October 2012. The bibliographies of the retrieved articles and relevant book chapters were also hand searched.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, P.
Lee, M. S.
Moon, T. W.
Choi, T. Y.
Park, T. Y.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Integrative Cancer Therapies

PURPOSE: To review the available literature on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments for cancer-related fatigue with an aim to develop directions for future research. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus were searched for relevant studies. Original clinical trials reporting on the use of CAM treatments for cancer-related fatigue were abstracted and critically reviewed.

Author(s): 
Sood, Amit
Barton, Debra L.
Bauer, Brent A.
Loprinzi, Charles L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health

INTRODUCTION: Despite questionable efficacy and safety, many women use a variety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to relieve menopause symptoms. METHODS: We examined the determinants and use of CAM therapies among a sample of menopausal-aged women in Canada by using a cross-sectional Web-based survey. RESULTS: Four hundred twenty-three women who were contacted through list serves, e-mail lists, and Internet advertisements provided complete data on demographics, use of CAM, therapies, and menopausal status and symptoms.

Author(s): 
Lunny, Carole A.
Fraser, Shawn N.
Publication Title: 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha R.
Deng, Gary
Johnson, Jillian A.
Mumber, Matthew
Seely, Dugald
Zick, Suzanna M.
Boyce, Lindsay M.
Tripathy, Debu
Publication Title: 
Swiss Medical Weekly

OBJECTIVE: An increasing number of patients with asthma are attracted by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Therefore, it is of importance that scientific evidence about the efficacy of this type of therapy is regarded. METHOD: We searched the electronic databases Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library for controlled trials and systematic reviews to evaluate the evidence of the most popular alternative therapies, i.e. acupuncture, homeopathy, breathing techniques, herbal and nutritional therapies.

Author(s): 
Steurer-Stey, Claudia
Russi, Erich W.
Steurer, Johann
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, little is known about whether CAM is offered in hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe to what extent CAM is offered in Norwegian and Danish hospitals and investigate possible changes in Norway since 2001. METHODS: A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. The questionnaire was sent to the person responsible for the clinical activity, typically the medical director.

Author(s): 
Salomonsen, Laila J.
Skovgaard, Lasse
la Cour, Søren
Nyborg, Lisbeth
Launsø, Laila
Fønnebø, Vinjar
Publication Title: 
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

OBJECTIVES: To systematically assess the prevalence of yoga-associated injuries and other adverse events in epidemiological studies. DESIGN: Systematic review of observational studies. METHODS: Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and IndMed were searched through October 2016 for epidemiological studies assessing the prevalence of adverse events of yoga practice or comparing the risk of any adverse events between yoga practitioners and non-yoga practitioners. RESULTS: Nine observational studies with a total 9129 yoga practitioners and 9903 non-yoga practitioners were included.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Ostermann, Thomas
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

Headaches, including primary headaches such as migraine and tension-type headache, are a common clinical problem. Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM), formerly known as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), uses evidence informed modalities to assist in the health and healing of patients. CIM commonly includes the use of nutrition, movement practices, manual therapy, traditional Chinese medicine, and mind-body strategies.

Author(s): 
Millstine, Denise
Chen, Christina Y.
Bauer, Brent

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