Complementary Therapies

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an integrative medicine approach to the management of asthma compared to standard clinical care on quality of life (QOL) and clinical outcomes. METHODS: This was a prospective parallel group repeated measurement randomized design. Participants were adults aged 18 to 80 years with asthma. The intervention consisted of six group sessions on the use of nutritional manipulation, yoga techniques, and journaling. Participants also received nutritional supplements: fish oil, vitamin C, and a standardized hops extract.

Author(s): 
Kligler, Benjamin
Homel, Peter
Blank, Arthur E.
Kenney, Jeanne
Levenson, Hanniel
Merrell, Woodson
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this review was to investigate the efficacy and safety of yoga interventions in treating patients with major depressive disorder. METHODS: MEDLINE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were screened through December 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing yoga to inactive or active comparators in patients with major depressive disorder were eligible. Primary outcomes included remission rates and severity of depression. Anxiety and adverse events were secondary outcomes. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Anheyer, Dennis
Lauche, Romy
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Emergency Medicine

BACKGROUND: A total of 2.7 million patients present to US emergency departments annually for management of low back pain (LBP). Despite optimal medical therapy, more than 50% remain functionally impaired 3 months later. We performed a systematic review to address the following question: Among patients with nonchronic LBP, does spinal manipulation, massage, exercise, or yoga, when combined with standard medical therapy, improve pain and functional outcomes more than standard medical therapy alone?

Author(s): 
Rothberg, Samantha
Friedman, Benjamin W.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traumatic Stress

Although there is an abundance of novel interventions for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often their efficacy remains unknown. This systematic review assessed the evidence for 15 new or novel interventions for the treatment of PTSD. Studies that investigated changes to PTSD symptoms following the delivery of any 1 of the 15 interventions of interest were identified through systematic literature searches. There were 19 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this study.

Author(s): 
Metcalf, Olivia
Varker, Tracey
Forbes, David
Phelps, Andrea
Dell, Lisa
DiBattista, Ashley
Ralph, Naomi
O'Donnell, Meaghan
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Dental Association (1939)

BACKGROUND: The authors compiled information on the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine, or CAM, use, as well as on reports of randomized clinical trials of CAM modalities used to treat chronic facial pain. TYPES OF STUDIES REVIEWED: The authors searched several databases for reports of clinical trials randomizing patients who had facial pain to a CAM intervention or to a control or comparison group.

Author(s): 
Myers, Cynthia D.
White, B. Alex
Heft, Marc W.
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

BACKGROUND: Meditation, imagery, acupuncture, and yoga are the most frequently offered mind and body practices in the Department of Veterans Affairs. Yet, the research on mind and body practices has been critiqued as being too limited in evidence and scope to inform clinical treatment. OBJECTIVES: We conducted a systematic scoping review of mind and body practices used with veterans or active duty military personnel to identify gaps in the literature and make recommendations for future primary research.

Author(s): 
Elwy, A. Rani
Johnston, Jennifer M.
Bormann, Jill E.
Hull, Amanda
Taylor, Stephanie L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: In 2001, the Canadian Psychiatric Association and the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) partnered to produce evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of depressive disorders. A revision of these guidelines was undertaken by CANMAT in 2008-2009 to reflect advances in the field. There is widespread interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: The CANMAT guidelines are based on a question-answer format to enhance accessibility to clinicians.

Author(s): 
Ravindran, Arun V.
Lam, Raymond W.
Filteau, Marie J.
Lespérance, François
Kennedy, Sidney H.
Parikh, Sagar V.
Patten, Scott B.
Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT)
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: Depressed and anxious patients often combine complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies with conventional pharmacotherapy to self-treat symptoms. The benefits and risks of such combination strategies have not been fully evaluated. This paper evaluates the risk-benefit profile of CAM augmentation to antidepressants in affective conditions. METHODS: PubMed was searched for all available clinical reports published in English up to December 2012. Data were evaluated based on graded levels of evidence for efficacy and safety.

Author(s): 
Ravindran, Arun V.
da Silva, Tricia L.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Stress is considered an important precipitating factor for seizures. Yoga is believed to induce relaxation and stress reduction. The effect of yoga on the EEG and the autonomic nervous system have been reported. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy (if proved effective), in view of its nonpharmacological nature, minimal side effects and international acceptance. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of yoga in the treatment of patients with epilepsy.

Author(s): 
Ramaratnam, S.
Sridharan, K.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Stress is considered an important precipitating factor for seizures. Yoga is believed to induce relaxation and stress reduction. The effect of yoga on the EEG and the autonomic nervous system have been reported. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy (if proved effective), in view of its nonpharmacological nature, minimal side effects and international acceptance. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of yoga in the treatment of patients with epilepsy.

Author(s): 
Ramaratnam, S.
Sridharan, K.

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