Dogs

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

The isoflavones tectoridin (TTR) and 3'-hydroxy TTR (3'-TTR) were isolated from an Ayurvedic herbal preparation Vacä and evaluated for their affinity and effect on ryanodine receptors (RyR) using junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (JSRVs). In [(3)H]ryanodine displacement binding affinity assays, TTR and 3'-TTR exhibited IC(50) values of 17.3 +/- 1.3 microM (K(d) = 6.7 +/- 0.4 microM) and 6.6 +/- 1.4 microM (K(d) = 2.4 +/- 0.2 microM), respectively, for fast skeletal muscle RyR (RyR1) compared with an IC(50) value for ryanodine of 6.2 +/- 0.4 nM (K(d) = 2.4 nM).

Author(s): 
Bidasee, K. R.
Maxwell, A.
Reynolds, W. F.
Patel, V.
Besch, H. R.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: The bark of Terminalia arjuna L. (Combretaceae) is used in Ayurveda since ancient times for the treatment of cardiac disorders. Previous laboratory investigations have demonstrated the use of the bark in cardiovascular complications. The present study was aimed to find the effect of 70% alcoholic extract of Terminalia arjuna on anaesthetized dog blood pressure and probable site of action.

Author(s): 
Nammi, Srinivas
Gudavalli, Rambabu
Babu, Behara S. Ravindra
Lodagala, Durga S.
Boini, Krishna M.
Publication Title: 
BMC microbiology

BACKGROUND: Lactobacillus plantarum is considered as a safe and effective probiotic microorganism. Among various sources of isolation, traditionally fermented foods are considered to be rich in Lactobacillus spp., which can be exploited for their probiotic attribute. Antibacterial property of L. plantarum has been demonstrated against various enteric pathogens in both in vitro and in vivo systems. This study was aimed at characterizing L.

Author(s): 
Kumar, Himanshu
Rangrez, Ashraf Y.
Dayananda, Kannayakanahalli M.
Atre, Ashwini N.
Patole, Milind S.
Shouche, Yogesh S.
Publication Title: 
Phytotherapy research: PTR

Associations of plants have been widely used, for centuries, in Ayurveda and in Chinese medicine and have been increasingly acknowledged in Western medicine. The objective of this study is to assess the level of toxicity of an association of three plants: Crataegus oxyacantha, Passiflora incarnata, and Valeriana officinalis (CPV extract). This association was administered to rats, mice, and dogs, both acute and chronically for 180 days. The tests used in the acute experiments were: observational pharmacological screening, LD(50), motor coordination and motor activity.

Author(s): 
Tabach, Ricardo
Rodrigues, Eliana
Carlini, E. A.
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Petroleum ether (PE), benzene (BE), chloroform (CE), acetone (AE) and ethanolic (EE) extracts (50-200 or 200 mg/kg, i.p. or 200 mg/kg, p.o.) of dried Abies pindrow leaves, given 30-45 min before showed significant anti-inflammatory (both against acute and sub-acute models), analgesic, barbiturate hypnosis potentiation and anti-ulcerogenic acitivities in rats. All the extracts except EE decreased swim stress immobility in mice indicating some degree of anti-depressant activity. Only PE exhibited hypotension in dogs blocked by atropine.

Author(s): 
Singh, R. K.
Nath, G.
Goel, R. K.
Bhattacharya, S. K.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

The isoflavones tectoridin (TTR) and 3'-hydroxy TTR (3'-TTR) were isolated from an Ayurvedic herbal preparation Vacä and evaluated for their affinity and effect on ryanodine receptors (RyR) using junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (JSRVs). In [(3)H]ryanodine displacement binding affinity assays, TTR and 3'-TTR exhibited IC(50) values of 17.3 +/- 1.3 microM (K(d) = 6.7 +/- 0.4 microM) and 6.6 +/- 1.4 microM (K(d) = 2.4 +/- 0.2 microM), respectively, for fast skeletal muscle RyR (RyR1) compared with an IC(50) value for ryanodine of 6.2 +/- 0.4 nM (K(d) = 2.4 nM).

Author(s): 
Bidasee, K. R.
Maxwell, A.
Reynolds, W. F.
Patel, V.
Besch, H. R.
Publication Title: 
Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology

Recurrent diarrhea is prevalent in developing countries, particularly in tropical regions. A natural based antidiarrheal home remedy can serve as an ideal health tool to limit diarrhea-related morbidity and mortality. In the traditional Indian medical science of Ayurveda, nutmeg is one such plant said to possess antidiarrheal activity. A study was therefore planned to assess the various pharmacological effects (antidiarrheal, sedative, analgesic and blood pressure) of nutmeg.

Author(s): 
Grover, J. K.
Khandkar, S.
Vats, V.
Dhunnoo, Y.
Das, D.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: The bark of Terminalia arjuna L. (Combretaceae) is used in Ayurveda since ancient times for the treatment of cardiac disorders. Previous laboratory investigations have demonstrated the use of the bark in cardiovascular complications. The present study was aimed to find the effect of 70% alcoholic extract of Terminalia arjuna on anaesthetized dog blood pressure and probable site of action.

Author(s): 
Nammi, Srinivas
Gudavalli, Rambabu
Babu, Behara S. Ravindra
Lodagala, Durga S.
Boini, Krishna M.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences: Official Journal of the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences

Traditionally Boswellia serrata extract is used in the Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In 2002 the EMEA designated Boswellia an orphan drug status for the treatment of peritumoral oedema. Pharmacokinetic studies yielded low plasma concentrations of the active ingredients 11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (KBA) and 3-acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA). In continuation of the tests investigating the factors limiting bioavailability of boswellic acids, the present study examined the permeability of KBA and AKBA in human Caco-2 cell lines.

Author(s): 
Krüger, Phillip
Kanzer, Johanna
Hummel, Jessica
Fricker, Gert
Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred
Abdel-Tawab, Mona
Publication Title: 
Phytotherapy research: PTR

Associations of plants have been widely used, for centuries, in Ayurveda and in Chinese medicine and have been increasingly acknowledged in Western medicine. The objective of this study is to assess the level of toxicity of an association of three plants: Crataegus oxyacantha, Passiflora incarnata, and Valeriana officinalis (CPV extract). This association was administered to rats, mice, and dogs, both acute and chronically for 180 days. The tests used in the acute experiments were: observational pharmacological screening, LD(50), motor coordination and motor activity.

Author(s): 
Tabach, Ricardo
Rodrigues, Eliana
Carlini, E. A.

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