Free Radicals

Publication Title: 

Four aqueous extracts from different parts of medicinal plants used in Ayurveda (an ancient Indian Medicine) viz., Momardica charantia Linn (AP1), Glycyrrhiza glabra (AP2), Acacia catechu (AP3), and Terminalia chebula (AP4) were examined for their potential as antioxidants. The antioxidant activity of these extracts was tested by studying the inhibition of radiation induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes at different doses in the range of 100-600 Gy as estimated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS).

Naik, G. H.
Priyadarsini, K. I.
Satav, J. G.
Banavalikar, M. M.
Sohoni, D. P.
Biyani, M. K.
Mohan, H.
Publication Title: 
Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

Radioprotective ability of the aqueous extract of the fruit of Terminalia chebula (TCE) was evaluated for its antioxidant and radioprotective abilities. TCE (50 microg) was able to neutralise 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, a stable free radical by 92.9%. The free radical neutralizing ability of TCE was comparable to that of ascorbate (100 microM) 93.5% and gallic acid (100 microM) 91.5% and was higher than that of the diethyldithiocarbamate (200 microM) 55.4%, suggesting the free radical activity of TCE.

Gandhi, Nitin Motilal
Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan
Publication Title: 
Medicinal Chemistry (Shariqah (United Arab Emirates))

Ethanolic extracts of 30 Thai medicinal plants, traditionally used as alternative treatments in diabetes, were evaluated for antioxidative activity by the 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) method. They were evaluated in vitro for oxidative stress by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) assay in pooled plasma of diabetic patients compared to without treatment of the extracts (control). The extracts were also assayed for protein glycation. The results showed that five plants had strong antioxidant activity: Phyllanthus emblica Linn.

Kusirisin, W.
Srichairatanakool, S.
Lerttrakarnnon, P.
Lailerd, N.
Suttajit, M.
Jaikang, C.
Chaiyasut, C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Terminalia chebula has an esteemed origin in Indian mythology; its fruits are used to treat many diseases such as digestive, diabetes, colic pain, chronic cough, sore throat, asthma, etc. AIM OF THE STUDY: The water or ethanolic extracts of the fruits were reported to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and radio-protector properties. The present study is to isolate and identify the compounds that inhibit COX and 5-LOX, the key enzymes involved in inflammation and carcinogenesis.

Reddy, D. Bharat
Reddy, T. C. M.
Jyotsna, G.
Sharan, Satish
Priya, Nalini
Lakshmipathi, V.
Reddanna, Pallu
Publication Title: 
Pharmaceutical Biology

CONTEXT: The Thai Lanna region has its own folklores and wisdoms in various fields such as traditional medicines. The galls of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae) frequently appear in many Thai Lanna medicinal plant recipes for promoting longevity. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the in vitro anti-aging activities of the extracts from 15 plants including T. chebula gall selected from the Thai medicinal plant recipes that have been traditionally used for longevity.

Manosroi, Aranya
Jantrawut, Pensak
Akihisa, Toshihiro
Manosroi, Worapaka
Manosroi, Jiradej
Publication Title: 
Journal of Complementary & Integrative Medicine

The in vitro study of the antioxidant properties of the hydroalcoholic extracts of various Indian medicinal plants can logically help to develop a better and safer way of amelioration from oxidative stress. As aimed, the present study has been done to estimate and thereby conclude regarding the antioxidant activities of a few Indian medicinal plants, viz., Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica, Emblica officinalis, Caesalpinia crista, Cajanus cajan, and Tinospora cordifolia.

Sarkar, Rhitajit
Mandal, Nripendranath
Publication Title: 

The present study has evaluated the healing effects of extract of dried fruit pulp of Terminalia chebula (TCE) on acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis in rats. TCE (600 mg/kg) showed healing effects against AA-induced colonic damage score and weight when administered orally daily for 14 days. TCE was further studied for its effects on various physical (mucus/blood in stool and stool frequency, food and water intake and body weight changes), histology, antibacterial activity and free radicals (NO and LPO), antioxidants (SOD, CAT and GSH) and myeloperoxidase in colonic tissue.

Gautam, M. K.
Goel, Shalini
Ghatule, R. R.
Singh, A.
Nath, G.
Goel, R. K.
Publication Title: 
Molecules (Basel, Switzerland)

Terminalia chebula, native to Southeast Asia, is a popular medicinal plant in Ayurveda. It has been previously reported to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory efficacy. In this study, we aimed to investigate if fruit extract from T. chebula might protect neuronal cells against ischemia and related diseases by reduction of oxidative damage and inflammation in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation (OGD-R) ischemia and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

Gaire, Bhakta Prasad
Jamarkattel-Pandit, Nirmala
Lee, Donghun
Song, Jungbin
Kim, Ji Young
Park, Juyeon
Jung, Soyoung
Choi, Ho-Young
Kim, Hocheol
Publication Title: 
Pharmaceutical Biology

CONTEXT: Arthritis is inflammation of one or more joints. Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae) fruit is mentioned in Ayurveda as useful in treating arthritic disorders. OBJECTIVE: This work was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-lipid peroxidative and membrane-stabilizing effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Terminalia chebula fruits and also to establish a possible association between them. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of T. chebula fruit extract at different doses ranged from 50 to 500?mg/kg, p.o.

Bag, Anwesa
Kumar Bhattacharyya, Subir
Kumar Pal, Nishith
Ranjan Chattopadhyay, Rabi
Publication Title: 
Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation

Abortion, primarily as a measure of population control, certainly continues to be an emotional, frustrating and stressful event. In continuation of our work on stressful situations in the female life span and biochemical parameters, serum lipid peroxide levels in terms of malondialdehyde (nmol/ml) have been determined in females undergoing abortion [suction curettage (n = 30), Emcredil-induced abortion (n = 30) and spontaneous abortion (n = 40)] and were compared with appropriate gestational controls.

Sane, A. S.
Chokshi, S. A.
Mishra, V. V.
Barad, D. P.
Shah, V. C.
Nagpal, S.


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