Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) by yoga therapists (YTs). OBJECTIVE: To determine the attitudes, skills, training, use, barriers and facilitators to the use of EBP amongst North American YTs DESIGN: Cross-sectional, descriptive survey METHODS: Self-identified YTs practicing in North America were invited to participate in an online survey. YT attitudes, skills, training, utilisation, barriers to use, and facilitators of EBP use were measured using the 84-item Evidence-Based practice Attitude and utilization SurvEy (EBASE).

Author(s): 
Sullivan, Marlysa
Leach, Matthew
Snow, James
Moonaz, Steffany
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

When a prominent Australian politician, the then Premier of Tasmania, The Honourable Jim Bacon, publicly announced in February 2004 that he had lung cancer, he was inundated with well-wishing communications sent by post, email and other means. They included 157 items of correspondence recommending a wide variety of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). The most common CAMs recommended were meditation, Chinese medicine, "glyconutrients", juices, Laetrile and various diets and dietary supplements.

Author(s): 
Lowenthal, Ray M.
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

When a prominent Australian politician, the then Premier of Tasmania, The Honourable Jim Bacon, publicly announced in February 2004 that he had lung cancer, he was inundated with well-wishing communications sent by post, email and other means. They included 157 items of correspondence recommending a wide variety of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). The most common CAMs recommended were meditation, Chinese medicine, "glyconutrients", juices, Laetrile and various diets and dietary supplements.

Author(s): 
Lowenthal, Ray M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing: Official Publication of The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society

Pregnancy presents many problems without working through additional problems in coping with an ostomy. Yet many women with an ostomy do get pregnant and do deliver healthy babies. Evidence-based nursing is of the utmost importance, as there is little published information on this topic. Because of the scarcity of pregnant subjects within the ostomy category, most studies, by necessity, select a purposive subject base. Therefore, other information sources regarding nursing management of the pregnant woman with an ostomy take on considerably more importance.

Author(s): 
Sredl, Darlene
Aukamp, Virginia
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Organization and Management

PURPOSE: The paper aims to take a reflective stance on the relationship between policy/evidence and practice, which, the authors argue, is conceptually under-developed. The paper aims to show that current research perspectives fail to frame evidence and policy in relation to practice. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A qualitative study was conducted in the English NHS in four Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). Seventy-five observations of meetings and 52 semi-structured interviews were completed.

Author(s): 
Gkeredakis, Emmanouil
Swan, Jacky
Powell, John
Nicolini, Davide
Scarbrough, Harry
Roginski, Claudia
Taylor-Phillips, Sian
Clarke, Aileen
Publication Title: 
AIDS education and prevention: official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education

Although the efficacy of small-group, risk reduction interventions based on cognitive behavioral principles has been widely documented in HIV behavioral research literature, little is known about how AIDS service organizations (ASOs) view these research-based models. From a nationwide sample of 77 ASOs, this study assessed factors influencing attitudes of prevention program directors and frontline staff toward research-based interventions.

Author(s): 
DiFranceisco, W.
Kelly, J. A.
Otto-Salaj, L.
McAuliffe, T. L.
Somlai, A. M.
Hackl, K.
Heckman, T. G.
Holtgrave, D. R.
Rompa, D. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVES: To determine what evidence exists to support the practice of viewing the deceased fetus by women terminating pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases searched (1966-2007) were Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Dissertation Abstracts Index. STUDY SELECTION: Literature was reviewed that either directly or parenthetically dealt with the emotional effects on women of viewing the fetus post termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA EXTRACTION: No randomized or controlled trials were found.

Author(s): 
Sloan, Eileen P.
Kirsh, Sharon
Mowbray, Mary
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nursing Education

Manifestations of stress and anger are becoming more evident in society. Anger, an emotion associated with stress, often affects other aspects of everyday life, including the workplace and the educational setting. Stress and irrational anger in nursing students presents a potential teaching-learning problem that requires innovative evidence-based solutions. In this article, anger in nursing students is discussed, and background information on the topic is provided.

Author(s): 
Shirey, Maria R.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Nursing

BACKGROUND: The emotion of disgust appears to promote psychological and behavioral avoidance, a dynamic that has significant implications in physical and psychological outcomes in colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients, caregivers, and health professionals alike are all potentially susceptible to responding with disgust and the associated avoidance. OBJECTIVE: This article aimed to review the early-stage literature related to disgust and CRC, consider the clinical implications, and suggest an appropriate research agenda.

Author(s): 
Reynolds, Lisa M.
Consedine, Nathan S.
Pizarro, David A.
Bissett, Ian P.
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Hot flashes are frequent and bothersome in menopausal women and breast cancer survivors. Most pharmacological interventions or herbal therapies for hot flashes have limitations because of contraindications in breast cancer survivors, side effects, or lack of proven efficacy. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of psychoeducational interventions, including relaxation, on hot flashes in menopausal women and women previously diagnosed with breast cancer.

Author(s): 
Tremblay, Anouk
Sheeran, Lisa
Aranda, Sanchia K.

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