Infant

Publication Title: 
Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of and reasons for the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in paediatric patients, and to determine the parental need for appropriate information from their paediatrician. DESIGN: Questionnaire. METHOD: A questionnaire was given to the parents of general paediatric patients of the St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein and the University Medical Centre Utrecht, the Netherlands, in the period June 2003-March 2004. Parents were asked about CAM use in the past 12 months, which CAM modalities were used and their reasons for using it.

Author(s): 
Vlieger, A. M.
van de Putte, E. M.
Hoeksma, H.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: Symptomatic management is often all that is recommended in children with fever. To date, only 2 nationwide surveys of pediatricians regarding their attitudes toward fever have been published. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the management of children with fever by pediatricians in Switzerland. METHODS: For this survey, an initial close-ended questionnaire was tested and subsequently corrected. Between June 2010 and March 2011, an invitation was sent via electronic mail containing a link to the final version of the questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Lava, Sebastiano A. G.
Simonetti, Giacomo D.
Ramelli, Gian Paolo
Tschumi, Sibylle
Bianchetti, Mario G.
Publication Title: 
The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a positive treatment effect of individualized homeopathic treatment for acute childhood diarrhea, but sample sizes were small and results were just at or near the level of statistical significance. Because all three studies followed the same basic study design, the combined data from these three studies were analyzed to obtain greater statistical power. METHODS: Three double blind clinical trials of diarrhea in 242 children ages 6 months to 5 years were analyzed as 1 group.

Author(s): 
Jacobs, Jennifer
Jonas, Wayne B.
Jiménez-Pérez, Margarita
Crothers, Dean
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

OBJECTIVE: To review the literature involving complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for pediatric otitis media. Multiple modalities are discussed, including prevention involving breastfeeding, nutrition, and vaccination; symptomatic treatment involving homeopathy, natural health products, and probiotics; manual manipulations involving osteopathy and chiropractics; and traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine.

Author(s): 
Levi, Jessica R.
Brody, Robert M.
McKee-Cole, Katie
Pribitkin, Edmund
O'Reilly, Robert
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Pediatrics

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although many publications have documented the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in children and adolescents, most have lacked the scientific rigor to establish clear benefits over so-called conventional medicine. We reviewed the literature published in the past year to identify the types of CAM most often studied in children, the variety of conditions to which these modalities are applied, and the methodologies used in the articles exploring the most prevalent CAM modalities.

Author(s): 
Snyder, John
Brown, Patrick
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Morbidity in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) research is an emerging field. Few studies have been published, and there is a lack of international standards for data collection and reporting. Based on the experience of developing a computerized system for patient data collection at the University of Technology, Sydney, (UTS) Acupuncture Clinic (Sydney, Australia), and reporting results from that database, a start can be made toward developing guidelines for reporting similar results from TCM clinical audits.

Author(s): 
Meier, Peter C.
Rogers, Carole
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Morbidity in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) research is an emerging field. Few studies have been published, and there is a lack of international standards for data collection and reporting. Based on the experience of developing a computerized system for patient data collection at the University of Technology, Sydney, (UTS) Acupuncture Clinic (Sydney, Australia), and reporting results from that database, a start can be made toward developing guidelines for reporting similar results from TCM clinical audits.

Author(s): 
Meier, Peter C.
Rogers, Carole
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

CONTEXT: Acupuncture is increasingly used in children; however, the safety of pediatric acupuncture has yet to be reported from systematic review. OBJECTIVE: To identify adverse events (AEs) associated with needle acupuncture in children. METHODS: Eighteen databases were searched, from inception to September 2010, irrespective of language. Inclusion criteria were that the study (1) was original peer-reviewed research, (2) included children from birth to 17 years, inclusively, (3) involved needle acupuncture, and (4) included assessment of AEs in a child.

Author(s): 
Adams, Denise
Cheng, Florence
Jou, Hsing
Aung, Steven
Yasui, Yutaka
Vohra, Sunita
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Pediatrics

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although many publications have documented the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in children and adolescents, most have lacked the scientific rigor to establish clear benefits over so-called conventional medicine. We reviewed the literature published in the past year to identify the types of CAM most often studied in children, the variety of conditions to which these modalities are applied, and the methodologies used in the articles exploring the most prevalent CAM modalities.

Author(s): 
Snyder, John
Brown, Patrick
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Drooling is a common problem for children with cerebral palsy (CP). This can be distressing for these children as well as for their parents and caregivers. The consequences of drooling include risk of social rejection, damp and soiled clothing, unpleasant odour, irritated chapped skin, mouth infections, dehydration, interference with speech, damage to books, communication aids, computers, and the risk of social isolation (Blasco 1992; Van der Burg 2006). A range of interventions exist that aim to reduce or eliminate drooling.

Author(s): 
Walshe, Margaret
Smith, Martine
Pennington, Lindsay

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