Middle Aged

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an integrative medicine approach to the management of asthma compared to standard clinical care on quality of life (QOL) and clinical outcomes. METHODS: This was a prospective parallel group repeated measurement randomized design. Participants were adults aged 18 to 80 years with asthma. The intervention consisted of six group sessions on the use of nutritional manipulation, yoga techniques, and journaling. Participants also received nutritional supplements: fish oil, vitamin C, and a standardized hops extract.

Author(s): 
Kligler, Benjamin
Homel, Peter
Blank, Arthur E.
Kenney, Jeanne
Levenson, Hanniel
Merrell, Woodson
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: The effects of mind-body exercises on individuals with chronic illnesses have attracted increasing attention. However, little effort had been made to systematically review the effects of these mind-body exercises on individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). This review aimed to appraise the current evidence of the effects of mind-body exercises on the physiological and psychological outcomes for the PD population. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Author(s): 
Kwok, JoJo Yan Yan
Choi, Kai Chow
Chan, Helen Yue Lai
Publication Title: 
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics

BACKGROUND: Psychosocial intervention has been suggested as a potentially effective supplement to medical treatment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but no reviews so far have quantified the existing research in terms of both psychological and physical health outcomes. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials evaluating the effects of psychosocial interventions on psychological and physical health outcomes in COPD. METHODS: Two independent raters screened 1,491 references for eligibility.

Author(s): 
Farver-Vestergaard, Ingeborg
Jacobsen, Dorte
Zachariae, Robert
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Sleep disorders are one of the most common difficulties facing older people. Meditative movement interventions (MMIs), a new category of exercise integrating physical activity and meditation (e.g., t'ai chi, yoga, and qigong), may benefit older people with sleep problems. This systematic review synthesized the evidence on the effect of MMIs on older people's quality of sleep.

Author(s): 
Wu, Wei-Wei
Kwong, Enid
Lan, Xiu-Yan
Jiang, Xiao-Ying
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that many perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women will experience menopause symptoms, hot flushes being the most common. Symptoms caused by fluctuating levels of oestrogen may be alleviated by HRT but there has been a marked global decline in its use due to concerns about the risks and benefits of HRT; consequently many women are now seeking alternatives.

Author(s): 
Daley, Amanda
Stokes-Lampard, Helen
Macarthur, Christine
Publication Title: 
Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation

PURPOSE: This article presents a systematic review of the literature pertaining to the use of yoga in stroke rehabilitation. In addition, we present the results of a small pilot study designed to explore the hypothesis that a Kundalini yoga practice of 12 weeks would lead to an improvement in aphasia as well as in fine motor coordination in stroke patients.

Author(s): 
Lynton, Holly
Kligler, Benjamin
Shiflett, Samuel
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Non-specific low back pain is a common, potentially disabling condition usually treated with self-care and non-prescription medication. For chronic low back pain, current guidelines state that exercise therapy may be beneficial. Yoga is a mind-body exercise sometimes used for non-specific low back pain. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga for treating chronic non-specific low back pain, compared to no specific treatment, a minimal intervention (e.g. education), or another active treatment, with a focus on pain, function, and adverse events.

Author(s): 
Wieland, L. Susan
Skoetz, Nicole
Pilkington, Karen
Vempati, Ramaprabhu
D'Adamo, Christopher R.
Berman, Brian M.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry Research

People with PTSD experience high levels of cardiovascular disease and comorbid mental health problems. Physical activity (PA) is an effective intervention in the general population. We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of PA on PTSD. We searched major electronic databases from inception till 03/2015 for RCTs of PA interventions among people with PTSD. A random effects meta-analysis calculating hedges g was conducted. From a potential of 812 hits, four unique RCTs met the inclusion criteria (n=200, mean age of participants 34-52 years).

Author(s): 
Rosenbaum, Simon
Vancampfort, Davy
Steel, Zachary
Newby, Jill
Ward, Philip B.
Stubbs, Brendon
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Haematological malignancies are malignant neoplasms of the myeloid or lymphatic cell lines including leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma. In order to manage physical and psychological aspects of the disease and its treatment, complementary therapies like yoga are coming increasingly into focus. However, the effectiveness of yoga practice for people suffering from haematological malignancies remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga practice in addition to standard cancer treatment for people with haematological malignancies.

Author(s): 
Felbel, Steffen
Meerpohl, Joerg J.
Monsef, Ina
Engert, Andreas
Skoetz, Nicole
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is funded by Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) and is being conducted by the University of York.

Author(s): 
Cox, Helen
Tilbrook, Helen
Aplin, John
Chuang, Ling-Hsiang
Hewitt, Catherine
Jayakody, Shalmini
Semlyen, Anna
Soares, Marta O.
Torgerson, David
Trewhela, Alison
Watt, Ian
Worthy, Gill

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