Mindfulness

Publication Title: 
Health Psychology: Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

OBJECTIVE: Cognitive perseverations that include worry and rumination over past or future events may prolong cortisol release, which in turn may contribute to predisease pathways and adversely affect physical health. Meditation training may increase self-reported mindfulness, which has been linked to reductions in cognitive perseverations. However, there are no reports that directly link self-reported mindfulness and resting cortisol output. Here, the authors investigate this link. METHODS: In an observational study, we measured self-reported mindfulness and p.m.

Author(s): 
Jacobs, Tonya L.
Shaver, Phillip R.
Epel, Elissa S.
Zanesco, Anthony P.
Aichele, Stephen R.
Bridwell, David A.
Rosenberg, Erika L.
King, Brandon G.
MacLean, Katherine A.
Sahdra, Baljinder K.
Kemeny, Margaret E.
Ferrer, Emilio
Wallace, B. Alan
Saron, Clifford D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article introduces the issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session entitled "Beyond Meditation: Mindfulness-Related Clinical Practices." In the article, I describe how the "sisters of mindfulness"-forgiveness, gratitude, loving-kindness, compassion, acceptance, and best-self visualization-are each interconnected and important forms of mindfulness as well as tenets of Buddhist psychology. Each of these practices reflect mental strengths that are being integrated into the brain's neuroplastic development as a function of modern day psychotherapy.

Author(s): 
Rosenzweig, Debra
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article discusses how loving-kindness can be used to treat traumatized refugees and minority groups, focusing on examples from our treatment, culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy (CA-CBT). To show how we integrate loving-kindness with other mindfulness interventions and why loving-kindness should be an effective therapeutic technique, we present a typology of mindfulness states and the Nodal Network Model (NNM) of Affect and Affect Regulation.

Author(s): 
Hinton, Devon E.
Ojserkis, Rebecca A.
Jalal, Baland
Peou, Sonith
Hofmann, Stefan G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traumatic Stress

Loving-kindness meditation is a practice designed to enhance feelings of kindness and compassion for self and others. Loving-kindness meditation involves repetition of phrases of positive intention for self and others. We undertook an open pilot trial of loving-kindness meditation for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Measures of PTSD, depression, self-compassion, and mindfulness were obtained at baseline, after a 12-week loving-kindness meditation course, and 3 months later.

Author(s): 
Kearney, David J.
Malte, Carol A.
McManus, Carolyn
Martinez, Michelle E.
Felleman, Ben
Simpson, Tracy L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Behavioral Addictions

Purpose In the last five years, scientific interest into the potential applications of Buddhist-derived interventions (BDIs) for the treatment of problem gambling has been growing. This paper reviews current directions, proposes conceptual applications, and discusses integration issues relating to the utilisation of BDIs as problem gambling treatments. Method Aliterature search and evaluation of the empirical literature for BDIs as problem gambling treatments was undertaken.

Author(s): 
Shonin, Edo
Van Gordon, William
Griffiths, Mark D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article introduces the issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session entitled "Beyond Meditation: Mindfulness-Related Clinical Practices." In the article, I describe how the "sisters of mindfulness"-forgiveness, gratitude, loving-kindness, compassion, acceptance, and best-self visualization-are each interconnected and important forms of mindfulness as well as tenets of Buddhist psychology. Each of these practices reflect mental strengths that are being integrated into the brain's neuroplastic development as a function of modern day psychotherapy.

Author(s): 
Rosenzweig, Debra
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

The healing process of the Best Self Visualization Method (BSM) is described within the framework of meditation, neuroscience, and psychodynamic theory. Cases are drawn from the treatment of high-risk youth, who have histories of poverty, survival of sexual and physical abuse, and/or current risk for perpetrating abuse. Clinical use of BSM is demonstrated in two case illustrations, one of group psychotherapy and another of individual therapy.

Author(s): 
Schussel, Lorne
Miller, Lisa
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

Self-compassion is conceptualized as containing 3 core components: self-kindness versus self-judgment, common humanity versus isolation, and mindfulness versus overidentification, when relating to painful experiences. Research evidence demonstrates that self-compassion is related to psychological flourishing and reduced psychopathology. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) is an 8-week training program, meeting 2.5 hours each week, designed to help participants cultivate self-compassion.

Author(s): 
Germer, Christopher K.
Neff, Kristin D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article discusses how loving-kindness can be used to treat traumatized refugees and minority groups, focusing on examples from our treatment, culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy (CA-CBT). To show how we integrate loving-kindness with other mindfulness interventions and why loving-kindness should be an effective therapeutic technique, we present a typology of mindfulness states and the Nodal Network Model (NNM) of Affect and Affect Regulation.

Author(s): 
Hinton, Devon E.
Ojserkis, Rebecca A.
Jalal, Baland
Peou, Sonith
Hofmann, Stefan G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traumatic Stress

Loving-kindness meditation is a practice designed to enhance feelings of kindness and compassion for self and others. Loving-kindness meditation involves repetition of phrases of positive intention for self and others. We undertook an open pilot trial of loving-kindness meditation for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Measures of PTSD, depression, self-compassion, and mindfulness were obtained at baseline, after a 12-week loving-kindness meditation course, and 3 months later.

Author(s): 
Kearney, David J.
Malte, Carol A.
McManus, Carolyn
Martinez, Michelle E.
Felleman, Ben
Simpson, Tracy L.

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