Models, Biological

Publication Title: 
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

It has been shown that human diploid cells from various donor ages can be arrested in an essentially nonmitotic state by reducing the serum concentration of the incubation medium from 10 to 0.5 percent. Cells incubated at this serum level maintained the population distribution that was present when the cells reached confluency. The population, which has 90 percent of the cells in the G1 phase of the division cycle, was not static and exhibited a low level of mitotic activity with prolonged interdivision times.

Author(s): 
Dell'Orco, R. T.
Publication Title: 
Folia Biologica

An extension of the mathematical model of immunological tolerance including two categories of B and T helper cells, each having a different lifespan, is presented. The simulated recovery from tolerance is compared with experimental data on B and T helper cell tolerance to human gamma globulin (HGG) induced in adult mice. The performed simulation runs suggest the conclusion that in this case it seems impossible to incorporate a high ratio of both, long-lived B cells and/or short-lived T helper cells, if good agreement with the available experimental data should be preserved.

Author(s): 
Dolezal, J.
Hraba, T.
Publication Title: 
Oncogene

Replicative senescence is thought to be a significant barrier to human tumorigenesis, which in human fibroblasts, and many other cell types, can be overcome experimentally by combined loss of function of p53 and Rb 'pathways'. To avoid the confounding pleiotropic effects of HPVE7 frequently used in such studies, here we have employed retroviral vectors over-expressing CDK4 or CDK6 as a more representative model of naturally-occurring mutations targeting the Rb pathway.

Author(s): 
Morris, Mark
Hepburn, Peter
Wynford-Thomas, David
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

We hypothesize that many ailments are attributable to dysfunctions of autonomic balance. The autonomic system is a primitive, highly-adaptive response system that allows differential allocation of biologic effort under varying conditions. The autonomic system, however, can execute a response that is inappropriate for the system stressor due to evolutionary displacement. Evolutionary displacement is a situation in which a trait that evolved as an adaptive response to certain conditions now faces a new set of conditions.

Author(s): 
Yun, A. Joon
Lee, Patrick Y.
Bazar, Kimberly A.
Publication Title: 
The EMBO journal

Telomere shortening in normal human cells causes replicative senescence, a p53-dependent growth arrest state, which is thought to represent an innate defence against tumour progression. However, although it has been postulated that critical telomere loss generates a 'DNA damage' signal, the signalling pathway(s) that alerts cells to short dysfunctional telomeres remains only partially defined.

Author(s): 
Gire, VÈronique
Roux, Pierre
Wynford-Thomas, David
Brondello, Jean-Marc
Dulic, Vjekoslav
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

Experimentally imposed calorie restriction (CR) is shown to result in the most reproducible endpoint of lifespan extension in all animals models tested. In this presentation, the question of CR's effect on human longevity is reviewed by discussing data pertinent to the putative efficacy of CR on humans. Arguments are presented in support of this possibility based on CR's unique abilities to retard biological functional declines and to deter pathological processes, both of which are major targets of deleterious oxidative stress.

Author(s): 
Yu, Byung Pal
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

Calorie restriction is known to increase lifespan in many but not all species and may perhaps not do so in humans. Exceptions to life extension have been identified in the laboratory and others are known in nature. Given the variety of physiological responses to variation in food supply that are possible, evolutionary life history theory indicates that an increased investment in maintenance in response to resource shortage will not always be the strategy that maximises Darwinian fitness.

Author(s): 
Shanley, Daryl P.
Kirkwood, Thomas B. L.
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

Dyskeratosis congenita (DC), an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, is caused by defects in telomerase. Somatic cells from DC patients have shortened telomeres and clinical symptoms are most pronounced in organs with a high cell turnover, including those involved in hematopoiesis and skin function. We previously identified an autosomal dominant (AD) form of DC that is caused by mutations in the telomerase RNA component (TER).

Author(s): 
Westin, Erik R.
Chavez, Elizabeth
Lee, Kimberly M.
Gourronc, Francoise A.
Riley, Soraya
Lansdorp, Peter M.
Goldman, Frederick D.
Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Biochemistry

FOXO (Forkhead box O) transcription factors constitute an evolutionally conserved subgroup within the large Forkhead family of transcription regulators. FOXO factors are important regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, oxidative stress resistance and longevity. Genetic studies of Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrated that FOXO factors are major targets of the insulin-like signalling implicated during the regulation of glucose metabolism and lifespan extension.

Author(s): 
Daitoku, Hiroaki
Fukamizu, Akiyoshi
Publication Title: 
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology

The complex, highly integrative endocrine system regulates all aspects of somatic maintenance and reproduction and has been widely implicated as an important determinant of longevity in short-lived traditional model organisms of aging research. Genetic or experimental manipulation of hormone profiles in mice has been proven to definitively alter longevity. These hormonally induced lifespan extension mechanisms may not necessarily be relevant to humans and other long-lived organisms that naturally show successful slow aging.

Author(s): 
Buffenstein, Rochelle
Pinto, Mario

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