Neoplasms

Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: Qigong as a complementary and alternative modality of traditional Chinese medicine is often used by cancer patients to manage their symptoms. The aim of this systematic review is to critically evaluate the effectiveness of qigong exercise in cancer care. METHODS: Thirteen databases were searched from their inceptions through November 2010. All controlled clinical trials of qigong exercise among cancer patients were included. The strength of the evidence was evaluated for all included studies using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence.

Author(s): 
Chan, Cecilia L. W.
Wang, Chong-Wen
Ho, Rainbow T. H.
Ng, Siu-man
Chan, Jessie S. M.
Ziea, Eric T. C.
Wong, Vivian C. W.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Scientists have long been interested in measuring external qi (EQ or wai qi) during qigong healing, and have produced a large body of literature over the past 20 years. This paper reviews the major research on measuring EQ in China and tries to help other researchers to get a picture on what has been done so as to eliminate the simple replication of already verified results.

Author(s): 
Chen, Kevin W.
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: This review (a) assesses the strength of evidence addressing Qigong therapy in supportive cancer care and (b) provides insights for definition of effective Qigong therapy in supportive cancer care. METHODS: This mixed-methods study includes (a) a systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) following PRISMA guidelines and (b) a constant-comparative qualitative analysis of effective intervention protocols. RESULTS: Eleven published randomized clinical trials were reviewed. A total of 831 individuals were studied.

Author(s): 
Klein, P. J.
Schneider, Roger
Rhoads, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Acta Oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)

Qigong is a mind-body integrative exercise or intervention from traditional Chinese medicine used to prevent and cure ailments, to improve health and energy levels through regular practice. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize and critically evaluate the effectiveness of qigong used as a stand-alone or additional therapy in cancer care.

Author(s): 
Lee, Myeong Soo
Chen, Kevin W.
Sancier, Kenneth M.
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Mind-body interventions are widely used by cancer patients to reduce symptoms and cope better with disease- and treatment-related symptoms. In the last decade, many clinical controlled trials of qigong/tai chi as a cancer treatment have emerged. This study aimed to quantitatively evaluate the effects of qigong/tai chi on the health-related outcomes of cancer patients. METHODS: Five databases (Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and the CAJ Full-text Database) were searched until June 30, 2013.

Author(s): 
Zeng, Yingchun
Luo, Taizhen
Xie, Huaan
Huang, Meiling
Cheng, Andy S. K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

CONTEXT: Most cancer patients suffer from both the disease itself and symptoms induced by conventional treatment. Available literature on the clinical effects on cancer patients of acupuncture, Tuina, Tai Chi, Qigong, and Traditional Chinese Medicine Five-Element Music Therapy (TCM-FEMT) reports controversial results. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of acupuncture, Tuina, Tai Chi, Qigong, and TCM-FEMT on various symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in patients with cancer; risk of bias for the selected trials also was assessed.

Author(s): 
Tao, Wei-Wei
Jiang, Hua
Tao, Xiao-Mei
Jiang, Ping
Sha, Li-Yan
Sun, Xian-Ce
Publication Title: 
Cancer prevention & control: CPC = Prevention & controle en cancerologie: PCC

PURPOSE: Health care professionals at 2 Ontario cancer centres were surveyed to determine their familiarity with, perceptions of and interest in learning more about nonpharmacologic strategies for the management of cancer pain. Evidence-based education sessions were subsequently developed for the 5 strategies in which participants were most interested. This article presents the results of critical literature reviews concerning the effectiveness of the 5 strategies: acupuncture, massage therapy, hypnosis, therapeutic touch and biofeedback.

Author(s): 
Sellick, S. M.
Zaza, C.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Many patients with cancer use complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies. Physicians need authoritative information on CAM therapies to responsibly advise patients who seek these interventions. This article summarizes current evidence on the efficacy and safety of selected CAM therapies that are commonly used by patients with cancer. The following major categories of interventions are covered: dietary modification and supplementation, herbal products and other biological agents, acupuncture, massage, exercise, and psychological and mind-body therapies.

Author(s): 
Weiger, Wendy A.
Smith, Michael
Boon, Heather
Richardson, Mary Ann
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Eisenberg, David M.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Pain (London, England)

AIMS: This systematic review summarises the existing evidence on acupuncture for cancer-related pain. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted in seven databases. All clinical studies of acupuncture, electroacupuncture and ear acupuncture in cancer patients with the main outcome measure of pain were included. Data were extracted according to pre-defined criteria by two independent reviewers and methodological quality was assessed using the Jadad scale.

Author(s): 
Lee, Hyangsook
Schmidt, Katja
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: In 1998, the National Institutes of Health Consensus Statement on Acupuncture concluded that promising results have emerged showing the efficacy of acupuncture in adult postoperative and chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The acupuncture point, P6 had been the point used in most of the trials. OBJECTIVES: To summarize Cochrane systematic reviews assessing P6 stimulation for nausea and vomiting. RESULTS: Reviews were found on postoperative sickness, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, and pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting.

Author(s): 
Ezzo, Jeanette
Streitberger, Konrad
Schneider, Antonius

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