Pastoral Care

Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

In 1988, with the publication of Catholic Health Ministry: A New Vision for a New Century, the Commission on Catholic Health Care Ministry called on the Church to redefine its healing mission in society. Unfortunately, despite various efforts, the Church has not yet fully articulated a shared vision of Catholic healthcare, healing, and support. Healing human brokenness has always been the Church's work in the world, whether the brokenness be physical, emotional, intellectual, moral, or spiritual.

Author(s): 
Fahey, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Home Healthcare Nurse Manager

The prospective payment system will require agencies to become more creative and network with community resources. This article describes a health needs assessment survey that provided the foundation for a parish nurse ministry. The survey revealed that parish nurses could complement home health nurses by filling some of the gaps in healthcare not provided by third-party payers.

Author(s): 
Thomas, D. J.
King, M. A.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law

Many young Americans, married and marriageable, are turning to more traditional or fundamentalist religions. Religiosity and ultra-strict morality often leads to attitudes that alter decision-making in marriage, divorce, and the disposition of the children of divorce. Judgmental pastoral counseling may affect these decisions even more. This paper discusses these issues, emphasizing the need for forensic psychiatrists involved in the custody arena to be aware of the religious, spiritual, irreligious, or even anti-religious feelings of the battling partners.

Author(s): 
Goldzband, M. G.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This essay chronicles the development of Catholic health care in the United States during the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. The author points to the religious pluralism and the respect for that pluralism as well as to the evangelical drive for conversion evident in Catholic hospitals. This essay is a phenomenological study of this commitment to pluralism and the evangelical impulse within the contexts of health care.

Author(s): 
Kauffman, Christopher J.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This article examines the current use of Jesus language in a convenience sample of twenty-five mission statements from Roman Catholic hospitals and health care systems in the United States. Only twelve statements specifically use the words "Jesus" or "Christ" in their mission statements. The author advocates the use of explicit Jesus language and modeling.

Author(s): 
Taylor, C.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This paper will examine the topic of identity in Roman Catholicism from the perspective of topics contained in or absent from mission statements of 25 Catholic health care institutions. In particular, I will look at these from the perspective of social justice as well as how this and other topics such as human dignity, sanctity of life, stewardship, pastoral care and the likelihood of mergers with other institutions will affect the healing ministry of Catholic health care providers.

Author(s): 
Shannon, T. A.
Publication Title: 
The journal of pastoral care & counseling: JPCC

The authors reviewed the literature on mental health issues among clergy and other religious professionals, using electronic searches of databases of medical (Medline), nursing (CINAHL), psychology (PsycINFO), religious (ATLA), and sociological research (Sociofile). The existing research indicates the Protestant clergy report higher levels of occupational stress than Catholic priests, brothers, or sisters. Catholic sisters repeatedly reported the lowest work-related stress, whereas women rabbis reported the highest stress levels in various studies.

Author(s): 
Weaver, Andrew J.
Flannelly, Kevin J.
Larson, David B.
Stapleton, Carolyn L.
Koenig, Harold G.
Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

Collaboration provides a unique opportunity for a variety of people and organizations to promote faith community nursing. With emphasis on holistic nursing, stewardship, and interpreting the dialogue between faith and health, educated nurses acting as health educators, planners, and counselors can aid in meeting the health needs and in promoting the well-being of their faith communities.

Author(s): 
Pattillo, Marilyn M.
Chesley, Dorothy
Castles, Pam
Sutter, Rebecca
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

The Sisters of Charity Health System, Lewiston, ME, a member of Covenant Health Systems, Lexington, MA, remains deeply committed to the mission of service begun by its foundress, St. Marguerite d'Youville. Although St. Marguerite experienced a hard life, her resilience and her commitment to the poor and disadvantaged serve as an inspiration to those who continue her legacy of compassionate care. The founding work of St. Marguerite and the sisters has helped to foster a culture in which the mission of service thrives among the system's 2,000 employees.

Author(s): 
Stapleton, Marguerite
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Ascension Health has asked all of its health care ministries to promote spirituality in the workplace. St. Mary's Health System, Evansville, IN, responded to this request with several initiatives, including the development, facilitation, and implementation of a new model for what St. Mary's calls its "Employee Renewal Day." Revamped from a voluntary unpaid day to a paid day on which participation is strongly encouraged, Employee Renewal Day 2004 focused on fellowship, relaxation, and the history and heritage of St. Mary's and its sponsor.

Author(s): 
Sister Betty Anne Darch, null
Newsmaster, Pamela

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