Professional-Patient Relations

Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Many nonpharmacologic (behavioral) techniques are being proposed for the therapy of essential hypertension. The research in this area is reviewed and divided roughly into two categories: the biofeedback and relaxation methodologies. While feedback can be used to lower pressures during laboratory training sessions, studies designed to alter basal blood pressure levels with biofeedback have not yet been reported. The absence of evidence for such changes through biofeedback limits the usefulness of this technique in hypertension control.

Author(s): 
Frumkin, K.
Nathan, R. J.
Prout, M. F.
Cohen, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Many nonpharmacologic (behavioral) techniques are being proposed for the therapy of essential hypertension. The research in this area is reviewed and divided roughly into two categories: the biofeedback and relaxation methodologies. While feedback can be used to lower pressures during laboratory training sessions, studies designed to alter basal blood pressure levels with biofeedback have not yet been reported. The absence of evidence for such changes through biofeedback limits the usefulness of this technique in hypertension control.

Author(s): 
Frumkin, K.
Nathan, R. J.
Prout, M. F.
Cohen, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal

Several authors have written of the need to embrace occupation and use it to energise our practice, research and education for the benefit of the profession, individual occupational therapists and ultimately, and most significantly, our clients. However, Wilcock (1999) best summarises the issues and the work that must be done, calling for the profession to adopt a consistent professional philosophy. This approach is entirely congruent with the paradigm approach proposed by Kielhofner (2009). Reinforcing the ideas of Doris Sym, Wilcock (p.

Author(s): 
Gustafsson, Louise
Molineux, Matthew
Bennett, Sally
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

Most debates in science and the humanities that cannot be settled are not about truth, nor about data, but about beliefs and world views. Philippe Leick's comment on entanglement models of homeopathy are a good example. Because of this, no argument, however, convincing to some, will settle that debate. The only thing that can resolve it is a large cultural shift. My own ideas about non-local models, for a whole category of possibly similar events of which homeopathy is but one example.

Author(s): 
Walach, Harald
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

In order to fully comprehend its therapeutic mode of action, homeopathy might require both 'local' bio-molecular mechanisms, such as memory of water and 'non-local' macro-entanglement, such as patient-practitioner-remedy (PPR) descriptions.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, L. R.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

As a therapeutic intervention, homeopathy is the target of increased scepticism because in the main, its remedies are diluted and succussed (potentized) out of material existence. This puts homeopathy seemingly at odds with the paradigm of conventional science, in particular, that atoms and molecules are the fundamental building blocks of all matter. Accordingly, homeopathy cannot work, so that any reported beneficial effects must, at best, be due to the placebo effect.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, Lionel R.
Publication Title: 
Forschende Komplementarmedizin Und Klassische Naturheilkunde = Research in Complementary and Natural Classical Medicine

BACKGROUND: One of the principle obstacles to homeopathy's general acceptance has been its perceived lack of sound theoretical basis within accepted deterministic bio-medical thought. This impasse might be circumvented if instead, appeal was made to the nondeterministic concepts of the physical sciences, e.g., quantum theory and its notions of entanglement, nonlocality, and uncertainty; Weak Quantum Theory (WQT) and Patient-Practitioner-Remedy (PPR) Entanglement representing two new complementary strands of thought with the potential to create a new theoretical basis for homeopathy.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, L. R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

INTRODUCTION: Within the developing theoretical context of quantum macroentanglement, a mathematical model of the Vital Force (Vf) has recently been formulated. It describes the Vf in terms of a hypothetical gyroscope with quantized angular momentum. This enables the Vf's state of health to be represented in terms of a "wave function" derived solely from secondary symptom observables produced in response to disease or homeopathic remedies.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, Lionel R.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

The possibility that non-linear quantum theory could be used to model PPR entanglement is discussed in relation to the treatment of miasms. In this model, miasms are imagined as disease entities behaving like solitary waves, or 'solitons' which, when trapped in a therapeutic state space, requiring equally soliton-like (miasmatic or high potency) remedies to effectively 'annihilate' them.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, L. R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: There is a growing need for students and practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine to gain experience with standardized data collection, patient outcomes measurement, and practice-based research. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a process for standardized data collection that could eventually be adopted for clinical, research, and quality assurance purposes. SETTINGS/LOCATION: The setting for this study was an acupuncture and Oriental medicine teaching clinic in Bloomington, Minnesota.

Author(s): 
Maiers, Michele
McKenzie, Eileen
Evans, Roni
McKenzie, Mark

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