Proteins

Publication Title: 
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

It has been shown that human diploid cells from various donor ages can be arrested in an essentially nonmitotic state by reducing the serum concentration of the incubation medium from 10 to 0.5 percent. Cells incubated at this serum level maintained the population distribution that was present when the cells reached confluency. The population, which has 90 percent of the cells in the G1 phase of the division cycle, was not static and exhibited a low level of mitotic activity with prolonged interdivision times.

Author(s): 
Dell'Orco, R. T.
Publication Title: 
The EMBO journal

Telomere loss has been proposed as a mechanism for counting cell divisions during aging in normal somatic cells. How such a mitotic clock initiates the intracellular signalling events that culminate in G1 cell cycle arrest and senescence to restrict the lifespan of normal human cells is not known. We investigated the possibility that critically short telomere length activates a DNA damage response pathway involving p53 and p21(WAF1) in aging cells.

Author(s): 
Vaziri, H.
West, M. D.
Allsopp, R. C.
Davison, T. S.
Wu, Y. S.
Arrowsmith, C. H.
Poirier, G. G.
Benchimol, S.
Publication Title: 
FEBS letters

Strains of Caenorhabditis elegans mutant for clk-1 exhibit a 20-40% increase in mean lifespan. clk-1 encodes a mitochondrial protein thought to be either an enzyme or regulatory molecule acting within the ubiquinone biosynthesis pathway. Here CLK-1 is shown to be related to the ubiquinol oxidase, alternative oxidase, and belong to the functionally diverse di-iron-carboxylate protein family which includes bacterioferritin and methane mono-oxygenase.

Author(s): 
Rea, S.
Publication Title: 
Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites with a life cycle characterized by a period of starvation; many ticks spend more than 95% of their life off the host. Autophagy, which is the process of bulk cytoplasmic degradation in eukaryotic cells, is induced by starvation and is essential for extension of the lifespan. Therefore, we hypothesized that autophagy also occurs in ticks; however, there has been no report on autophagy-related (ATG) genes in ticks.

Author(s): 
Umemiya, Rika
Matsuo, Tomohide
Hatta, Takeshi
Sakakibara, Shin-ichi
Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren
Fujisaki, Kozo
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

Over the last 10?years, various screens of small molecules have been conducted to find long sought interventions in aging. Most of these studies were performed in invertebrates but the demonstration of pharmacological lifespan extension in the mouse has created considerable excitement. Since aging is a common risk factor for several chronic diseases, there is a reasonable expectation that some compounds capable of extending lifespan will be useful for preventing a range of age-related diseases.

Author(s): 
Alavez, Silvestre
Lithgow, Gordon J.
Publication Title: 
Cell

Aging entails a progressive decline in protein homeostasis, which often leads to age-related diseases. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of protein synthesis and maturation for secreted and membrane proteins. Correct folding of ER proteins requires covalent attachment of N-linked glycan oligosaccharides. Here, we report that increased synthesis of N-glycan precursors in the hexosamine pathway improves ER protein homeostasis and extends lifespan in C. elegans.

Author(s): 
Denzel, Martin S.
Storm, Nadia J.
Gutschmidt, Aljona
Baddi, Ruth
Hinze, Yvonne
Jarosch, Ernst
Sommer, Thomas
Hoppe, Thorsten
Antebi, Adam
Publication Title: 
BioEssays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Recent work on a small European cave salamander (Proteus anguinus) has revealed that it has exceptional longevity, yet it appears to have unexceptional defences against oxidative damage. This paper comes at the end of a string of other studies that are calling into question the free-radical damage theory of ageing. This theory rose to prominence in the 1990s as the dominant theory for why we age and die. Despite substantial correlative evidence to support it, studies in the last five years have raised doubts over its importance.

Author(s): 
Speakman, John R.
Selman, Colin
Publication Title: 
Biochemistry. Biokhimii?a

The processes that lead to violation of genome integrity are known to increase with age. This phenomenon is caused both by increased production of reactive oxygen species and a decline in the efficiency of antioxidant defense system as well as systems maintaining genome stability. Accumulation of different unrepairable genome damage with age may be the cause of many age-related diseases and the development of phenotypic and physiological signs of aging.

Author(s): 
Shilovsky, G. A.
Khokhlov, A. N.
Shram, S. I.
Publication Title: 
Cell

The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) generates metabolites for protein N- and O-glycosylation. Wang et al. and Denzel et al. report a hitherto unknown link between the HBP and stress in the endoplasmic reticulum. These studies establish the HBP as a critical component of the cellular machinery of protein homeostasis.

Author(s): 
Vincenz, Lisa
Hartl, F. Ulrich
Publication Title: 
Cell

Aging entails a progressive decline in protein homeostasis, which often leads to age-related diseases. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of protein synthesis and maturation for secreted and membrane proteins. Correct folding of ER proteins requires covalent attachment of N-linked glycan oligosaccharides. Here, we report that increased synthesis of N-glycan precursors in the hexosamine pathway improves ER protein homeostasis and extends lifespan in C. elegans.

Author(s): 
Denzel, Martin S.
Storm, Nadia J.
Gutschmidt, Aljona
Baddi, Ruth
Hinze, Yvonne
Jarosch, Ernst
Sommer, Thomas
Hoppe, Thorsten
Antebi, Adam

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